Connect with us

     

Life

Tambuwal: Four million residents in danger as Goronyo Dam shrinks

Published

on

Tambuwal: Four million residents in danger as Goronyo Dam shrinks

Sokoto State Governor, Aminu Tambuwal, yesterday urged stakeholders in the state to work together to tackle problem of water shortage at Goronyo Dam, the level of which had shrunk by almost 90 per cent.

The dam had served as the primary source of water for close to four million people in Sokoto and Kebbi states in the North West part of the country. Water from the dam was often used for domestic and irrigation purposes in the two affected states.

Speaking when he led officials on an inspection visit to the dam, Tambuwal said the depletion of the dam’s water level was alarming.

“The reservoir of Goronyo Dam was constructed to hold one billion cubic metres of water but as we’ve seen today, the water in it is just about 100 million cubic metres. “This has resulted in inadequate supply of water to our water board and in effect, we had to resort to rationing water to the people. “Our farmers are also suffering because output from this year’s dry season farming will invariably be affected.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement
1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Bernardina Reitzel

    November 12, 2019 at 5:50 am

    very cool

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Life

Lagos CJ directs magistrates to adopt non-custodial sentence for lesser offences

Published

on

Lagos CJ directs magistrates to adopt  non-custodial sentence for lesser offences

 

The Chief Judge of Lagos State, Justice Opeyemi Oke, has directed magistrates in the state to deploy more of non-custodial sentencing for minor offenders in order to decongest the prisons.
Justice Oke issued the directives while granting freedom to nine inmates.
She said the Chief Registrar had been directed to issue a circular to formally instruct magistrate courts to make use of non-custodial sentences for minor offences like street trading, unveiling plans by the Lagos state government to set up restorative justice centers in the state.
Justice Oke said: “All our magistrates would henceforth be monitored to ensure compliance with the directive.
“All simple cases need not go to police. The restorative justice centre is a mediation centre. If there is an agreement and the guilty one can pay for a missing tooth, why go to court?
This is a way of decongesting the prisons.”
Five inmates of 25 shortlisted were released from Medium Security Prisons, including Saidi Raimi from Kwara State, who was released to a mental home.
Also, four of ten shortlisted, were released from the Maximum Security Prisons, Kirikiri, having been in custody for between eight and eleven years and longer than the number of years they would have spent if sentenced by the court for offences charged.
The Chief Judge told the freed inmates to henceforth be of good behaviour and stay away from crime.
“Pursuant to the provisions of Sections 1(1) of the Criminal Justice (Release from Custody) Act, 2007 as well as Section 35 of the 1999 Constitution, you are hereby released from custody today, December 6, 2018.
“I want you to henceforth be of good behaviour. Make sure you don’t breach any law again. Go out there and sin no more”, she said.
Although ten women were shortlisted for release in the Female Prisons, she regretted that none qualified for release as trial had commenced in their matter and were presently on bail.
One of them, Ms Uche Emeasoba, however had her bail conditions reduced from N1 million to N500,000 and sureties reduced to one.
The Chief judge explained that those granted amnesty qualified for release after a thorough review of their case file.
Lagos State Controller of Prisons, Tunde Ladipo, while responding to questions from newsmen commended the Lagos Chief Judge for bringing hope to the inmates and on her efforts to decongest the prisons.
Ladipo also noted the efforts of the Nigerian Prisons Service to decongest the Prisons saying that this was why the federal government set up the Presidential Committee on Prerogative of Mercy for deserving inmates.
Earlier, Deputy Controller of Prisons, Medium Security Prisons, Kirikiri, Rev. Freedman Ben-Rabbi had requested the Chief Judge to assist them through provisions of court cells at the premises of Igbosere High Court and Isolo and Ejigbo magistrate courts.

Continue Reading

Life

Tribute to Celestine Nnaemeka Ughanze

Published

on

Tribute to Celestine Nnaemeka Ughanze

At about 11:30p.m. on June 1, 2018, my phone rang. I picked the phone and it was Clement Ugochukwu Esq, a junior Counsel in the Law Firm of Chief Celestine Ughanze who was calling. I reluctantly picked the phone. He said: “Senior, my oga is dead.”

I exclaimed and responded: “How, when and why?” He replied: “My Oga died on the 29th day of May, 2018 in a motor accident somewhere in Ondo State.” Mr. Ugochukwu had no answer to why he died. After I heard the sad news of this unfortunate incident, sleep deserted me and I was awake thinking why Chief Ughanze should die. Throughout the remaining part of the night and day break I could not fathom an answer.

The Almighty God is omnipotent, omnipresence and omniscience. One thing God has hidden from man is to know when, how and why a man should die. It is only God that knows and determines when a man will die, how a man will die and why a man should die.

That is why people die in various ways. People also die at birth, very young age, average age and old age. And in whichever way and at what age a person dies, we lack the capacity to question God. I met Chief Ughanze in 1981 when I got admission into University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus to read Law. He also got admission the same year with me to read Law. As classmates, we interacted and became friends and our friendship continued until his demise. While we were in the university, Chief Ughanze was focused in his studies. He knew why he came to school. He did not allow some of those things that distract students and keep them beyond the regulated time to affect him. He graduated in flying colours with his mates in 1985 and was called to the Bar in 1986. Thereafter, he was enrolled as a Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of Nigeria.

He was a member of the NLS class of 1986, known for their distinguished achievements in the legal profession and other endeavours. He had successful legal practice before venturing into politics. It is usually said: a chick that will become a cock will be known or identified on the day it is hatched. Ughanze showed remarkable interest in student known politics. When Law Students Association House of Assembly was established, Ughanze was one of the foundation members.

He was repeatedly elected by members of his class and rose to become the Speaker of the Law Student House of Assembly. It was therefore not surprising when he left legal practice to join politics. I knew that he was moving into a familiar terrain.

He contested and won election into the House of Representatives, where he represented the good people of Oyi/Ayamelu Federal Constituency between 1999 and 2007. As a parliamentarian, he was alive to his responsibilities. He was chairman of various committees of the House and also served as a member in some committees of the House. Chief Ughanze was a man with principle and very scrupulous. He was a man who neither stands on the fence nor pretends to be neutral on any issue. Once he has made up his mind and takes a position he remains in that position even if he finds himself in the minority.

He never supported anything or policy that will be detrimental to his constituents and Igbo people in general. Little wonder, he teamed up with like minds to shoot down the Third Term Agenda of the erstwhile administration of this country. In all his dealings and relationships with people he was transparent, honest, reliable and dependable.

He was a grassroots man who loved his people of Umunya and identified with them in all ramifications. He was also loved by his people and was rewarded by his people with the conferment of a chieftaincy title of “Ifeadika Nwanne”. True to his title he appreciates relations and even treat his friends as if they are his relations. He was a devout catholic and a good family man. He was always willing to assist any person in need. A song writer once wrote that we will only be remembered by what we have done in this world when we are gone. I will remember my bosom friend, Chief Ughanze for his uprightness, integrity, his affection to relations and friends, his insistence to see that things are done in the right way, his incorruptible nature, his love for God, his forthrightness and his dependability.

Adieu Chief Ughanze, an honourable gentleman. While I pray to God for the repose of his gentle soul in the bosom of our Lord, I would urge the wife, children and family members to bear this irreparable loss with fortitude. They should look unto God who in ages past has been our help. In the years to come, He will be our hope. He will shelter us from this and future stormy blasts. May it be so in Jesus name. Amen. To every member of the Uganze family, please accept my heartfelt condolences.

 

*Chief Akuma (MON) is a Senior Advocate of Nigeria (SAN).

Continue Reading

Life

Anatomy of A WordPress Themes

Published

on

WordPress themes

A while ago, we introduced to you the concept of creating a WordPress theme from HTML. We split the tutorial into two parts, and you can check out the first installation here and the second here. Today we are all about fleshing out the two tutorials, so feel free to regard this post as the third serving in the post series. My objective is to take apart the WordPress theme to give you a clear picture of how it (the theme) works.

This post assumes you have a working knowledge of HTML and CSS. I will go ahead and declare that having HTML and CSS skills is a prerequisite in designing WordPress themes. One more thing, this post will stay clear of big words and difficult concepts – it will be easy to comprehend, so be ready to have fun and learn.

A Little HTML Priming

Every HTML web page is split into different parts using the <div> tag. For instance, you can break the body (<body>) of your website into several sections such as navigation, header, main content, sidebar and footer amongst others.

Once you have your web page in sections, you can order (or arrange) the sections as you wish using CSS. This process is known as styling, and it involves adding other style elements such as color, size, borders, special effects etc. Such is the power of CSS, which – by the way – is short for Cascading Style Sheets. When you put your HTMl and CSS files together and throw in a couple of images, you end up with a complete website.

Things are not very different with WordPress themes. As we saw in part 1 of How To Create A WordPress Theme from HTML, WordPress themes are split into different files. If you cannot spot some similarity at this point, allow me to explain.

Static HTML web pages are split into divisions (what we called sections earlier on) using <div> tags (or tables if you’re really old school). On the other hand, WordPress themes are split into different php files, which are then put back together using template tags.

Therefore, instead of having all body elements (header, main content, sidebar, footer etc) living in a single file (as is the case with static HTML), each of the body elements (in WordPress themes) lives in a separate files.

So, the header will live in header.php, the sidebar will find home in sidebar.php, the main content will live in index.php, or single.php (if it’s a post) or page.php (if it’s a page). The footer section will live in footer.php and so on.

Are you following? Check out the illustration below:

Proin tristique elit et augue varius pellentesque. Donec enim neque, vulputate et commodo in, tristique sed velit. Phasellus adipiscing faucibus felis eget hendrerit. Vestibulum aliquet mauris sed felis convallis, sed tempus augue malesuada. Vivamus mauris lorem, laoreet sed suscipit nec, dapibus at elit. In in augue lobortis, eleifend tortor et, varius eros. Vivamus dignissim sed justo vitae suscipit. Mauris mi sem, malesuada sed sapien ut, sagittis condimentum urna. Nullam lacus mi, vulputate sed sollicitudin in, semper ut elit. Phasellus nec est at leo euismod placerat a porttitor est. Curabitur vel varius nunc, nec tincidunt magna. Proin eros mauris, lobortis id quam non, euismod fringilla nulla. Fusce vel nisi et turpis tempor molestie sit amet a dolor.

THEMATIC (CHILD) THEMES

Thematic uses Child Themes, these are essentially stripped down versions of a full WP theme, that needs the Thematic Framework for functionality. Upon download, Thematic comes packaged with a basic child theme, but you can download many more from the Thematic homepage. Download Thematic Child Themes.

Below, you will find a small selection of themes available for Thematic.

Acamas Child Theme

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14" font_style=”italic” color=”#474747" bgcolor=”#F5F5F5" bcolor=”#dd9933" arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote][/quote]>this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

 

Continue Reading

Design

Migrating A Website To WordPress

Published

on

Migrating A Website To WordPress

Now powering over 17% of the Web, WordPress is increasingly becoming the content management system (CMS) of choice for the average user. But what about websites built with an outdated CMS or without a CMS at all? Does moving to WordPress mean starting over and losing all the time, energy and money put into the current website? Nope!

Migrating a website (including the design) over to WordPress is actually easier than you might think. In this guide, we’ll outline the migration process and work through the steps with a sample project. We’ll also cover some of the challenges you might encounter and review the solutions.

WordPress Themes

About This Guide

Before we get to work, let’s establish some context. First, this guide was written primarily with beginners in mind and will be most helpful for basic websites. Some of you will likely encounter advanced aspects of WordPress migration, but they are beyond the scope of this guide. If you’re tackling an advanced migration and get stuck, feel free to share your difficulty in the comments below.

OBJECTIVES

The objective of this guide is to help you with the following:

  • Plan an effective migration to WordPress.
  • Walk through the technical steps involved in migrating.
  • Get ideas and resources to solve common migration challenges.
  • WordPress Themes

ASSUMPTIONS

I assume you have basic familiarity with WordPress. Previous development experience with WordPress would be helpful, but not necessary. I also assume you have an existing website and design that you want to migrate to WordPress.

Starting With A Plan

BASIC STEPS

Here are the basic steps that I recommend you follow for a typical WordPress migration:

  1. Evaluate website.
    Work carefully through the pages on your existing website, identifying all of the types of content (standard pages, photo galleries, resource pages, etc.) and noting any areas that need special attention.
  2. Set up environment.
    Set up WordPress and get ready to import.
  3. Import content.
    Bring over and organize your content, whether via an importing tool, manual entry (for a small amount, when no tool is available) or a custom importing process.
  4. Migrate design.
    Incorporate your existing design into a custom WordPress theme.
  5. Review website, go live.
    Carefully review the import, making adjustments where needed, set up any URL redirects, and then go live.
  6. WordPress Themes

With this outline in mind, let’s work through each step in detail.

Start With A Plan

The key to a successful migration is to carefully evaluate your current website. You need to figure out how to import and structure the content in WordPress before carrying over the design.

While the principles are the same across migration projects, the details often vary. So, below are two lists of questions to ask as you work out a plan.

IMPORTED CONTENT

  • How much content needs to be imported (number of pages, number of images, etc.)?
  • Is the volume low enough to be imported manually, or do you need a tool?
  • If you need a tool, does one already exist?
  • Can the content be categorized into the standard “posts” and “pages,” or does it call for custom post types?
  • Does extra content need to be stored for certain pages (custom fields, taxonomies, etc.)?
  • Will the URL structure change? If so, will the old URLs need to be redirected?

EXISTING FUNCTIONALITY

  • Does the website integrate any third-party services (data collection, reservations, etc.)?
  • Do any forms need to be migrated (contact forms, application forms, etc.)?
  • Is access to any content restricted (such as members-only content)?
  • Does the website sell products (digital or physical)?
  • Do any administrative tools need to be carried over (such as custom CMS functionality)?
  • WordPress Themes

A WORKING EXAMPLE

My brother, Joshua Wold, has volunteered a website to serve as an example; it’s for a side project of his in which he sells posters and postcards of a Vegan Food Pyramid. He built the website in plain HTML, with some basic PHP includes for the header and footer. Below is a screencast of me evaluating the website to give you a sense of how the process will work. Enjoy!

Set Up WordPress

Before importing the content, we need to get WordPress ready to go. If you’re just experimenting or if you prefer offline development, start with a local installation of WordPress. Otherwise, the next step is to install WordPress with your current hosting provider; or you could use the migration process as a great opportunity to move to a new host.

Once WordPress is up and running, you’re ready for action!

WordPress Themes

Setting Up WordPress

For our example, we’ve installed WordPress with the same host, setting it up in a wp directory for the duration of the migration process.

SETTINGS AND PLUGINS

With WordPress Themes installed, we’ll make a few minor adjustments:

  • Update permalinks.
    Go to Settings → Permalinks to make changes. In most cases, I’ll switch to “postname”-style permalinks.
  • Update users.
    I create an admin-level account for myself and any admin or editor accounts that are needed for clients and collaborators. I also remove the default “admin” user name if it exists (a basic but wise step for WordPress security).

Depending on the needs of the project, we might have to preinstall plugins. Here are the major categories of plugins:

  • Form management
    Migrating a form “as is” is usually a mess; simply recreating it using a forms plugin is usually easier. My current favorite is Gravity Forms ($39+ per license). Other options are Formidable (with free and pro versions) and Contact Form 7 (entirely free).
  • SEO management
    Search engine optimization (SEO) is a touchy subject. My philosophy is to build content for people, not for search engines. That being said, there is a common-sense approach to SEO that is solidly supported by the WordPress plugin ecosystem. And if your old website includes custom meta descriptions, giving them a new home during the importing process is important. I recommendWordPress SEO (free).
  • Multiple languages
    If your old website supports multiple languages, WordPress has you covered. My plugin of choice is WPML ($79 per license, free for non-profits). Another option isqTranslate (free).
  • Security
    WordPress security is a topic near and dear to me. The increasing popularity of WordPress has made it a target for security attacks. WordPress itself is rarely the problem; a poorly secured hosting environment or an outdated or poorly developed plugin usually is. I use managed WordPress hosting for the majority of my projects, which offers a good foundation for solid WordPress security. Options include WPEngine, ZippyKid, Pagely and Synthesis. In addition to managed hosting (and especially if you opt for a non-managed host), consider installing a security plugin, such as Better WP Security (free) or Wordfence (also free). Last but not least, review the “Hardening WordPress” guide in the Codex.
  • Backups
    If you opt for managed hosting, backups are usually included (make sure, though). If you’re managing backups yourself or you want an extra layer of data protection, great options are available, including VaultPress ($15+ a month), CodeGuard ($5+ a month), BackupBuddy ($75+ per license) and BackWPup (free).
  • from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/05/15/migrate-existing-website-to-wordpress/[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14" font_style=”italic” color=”#474747" bgcolor=”#F5F5F5" bcolor=”#dd9933" arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote][/quote]>this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates
Continue Reading

Entertainment

Create A Tab Widget In WordPress

Published

on

In this WordPress tutorial, you’ll learn how to create the Tabber widget, which is very useful for when multiple widgets need to fit in a sidebar. It saves space and streamlines the appearance and functionality of your WordPress-powered website.

In the past, there were different methods of doing this, most of which were theme-dependent. As we’ll see in this tutorial, creating a tabbed widget that works on its own and with any theme is easily accomplished. So, let’s jump in and learn how to create our own Tabber widget, which we’ve made available for downloading at the end of this article.

create-tabber-widget-splash

Saving Sidebar Space

The main advantage of tabs is that you can fit more widgets into the sidebar. And tabs look good. The image below shows how much vertical space is taken up by three standard widgets (using the default Twenty Ten theme). The default layout is on the left, and our tabber widget is on the right:

tabber_example

Before We Start

A few things are useful to know. Because we are building a widget in this article, you might want to learn about WordPress’ Widgets API and how to create a basic widget:

Use these resources as needed while following the tutorial along.

The Basic Idea

The idea for this widget is simple: select a sidebar, and the Tabber widget will grab all of its widgets and display them as tabs. In the widget’s interface, you can select a sidebar, specify an extra CSS class and optionally apply your own styles. When enabled, the plugin will register an extra sidebar (which may be removed if you have other ways to add a sidebar). Then, using the same code, you can add more sidebars, and each of them can hold instances of the Tabber widget.

To control your widgets, Tabber uses idTabs for jQuery, created by Sean Catchpole, but you could always use another solution. Note that additional CSS is loaded to style the resulting widget.

So, the goal with Tabber is to transform any widget’s output into markup that can be used to display tabs

tags for this. Other themes may use complicated markup that can’t be predicted or successfully transformed into the output needed for tabs.

The solution to this problem is to intercept the widget’s parameters before rendering, and then to restructure them into useful structures using JavaScript or jQuery for the tabbed output. More on that later.

action. We register the widget on line 17.

Widget Interface
Widget interface.

The Main Tabber Widget Class

Tabber is a normal widget, and in this case it is located

SETTINGS: PLUGIN INTERFACE

The widget has two settings:

  • “sidebar”
    to hold the ID of the selected sidebar
  • “css”
    for extra CSS classes to style the Tabber widget

When selecting which sidebar to use, you must avoid using the sidebar that holds the Tabber widget. Otherwise, it will spin into endless recursion. To avoid this, before rendering the widget’s content, check whether the selected sidebar is the same as the parent sidebar. This can’t be prevented while the widget is set up, because the widget’s panel affords very little control over this.

Also, using sidebars that are not normally used is a good idea. To help with this, the plugin includes sample code to help you add an extra sidebar.

This function requires the name of the sidebar, and it will display all widgets in it. Line 9 contains the check mentioned before, to prevent recursion when displaying sidebar content if the selected sidebar is the same as the parent sidebar.

Lastly, the filter is removed, and any widgets belonging to other sidebars are displayed normally, without modification.

WIDGET MODIFICATION

To prepare for the transformation done with JavaScript, the tabber widget includes the

tag for the control tabs. After this filter, the widget’s output will look like this:

JavaScript For Widget Transformation

Once the widget’s presentation is modified, one thing remains: to complete the transformation and get the titles from the widgets and turn them into tabs:This code uses jQuery to get all of the Tabber widgets based on the

  • will hold only its content.

Final Tabber Example
Final Tabber example.

Finally, when all this is done, we enable idTabs to activate the tabs control. And with the default styling loaded from the

How To Install The Tabber Plugin

As with any other plugin, unpack it, upload it to WordPress’ plugins folder, and activate it from the plugins panel. When you go to the “Widgets” panel, you will see an additional sidebar, “Tabber Example Sidebar,” at the end on the right. And “Available Widgets” will show one more widget, “D4P Smashing Tabber.”

Add this new widget to the “Main Sidebar.” From the “Sidebar” widget drop-down menu, select “Tabber Example Sidebar,” and save the widget. Now, open the “Tabber Example Sidebar” and add the widgets you want to be displayed as tabs. You can add as many widgets as you want, but pay attention because if you add too many, the tab’s control will break to two or more lines, and it will not look pretty. Starting with two or three widgets is best.

Conclusion

Creating one widget to display several other widgets as a tab isn’t very difficult, as you can see. The trick is in adjusting the widgets’ output to a format that can be transformed into tabs, and then using JavaScript to display them. We’ve explored just one possible transformation method; you can always experiment with ways to rearrange widget elements.

We used idTabs here, but there are many methods of displaying tabs, and not all of them require JavaScript:

I prefer using a jQuery-based solution, and idTabs is very easy to use and easy to style and it works in all browsers. Check out other solutions, and see what extra features they offer to enhance your own tabbed widgets.

 

from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/08/27/a-tour-of-wordpress-4-0/

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14" font_style=”italic” color=”#474747" bgcolor=”#F5F5F5" bcolor=”#dd9933" arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote][/quote]>this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Create A Tab Widget In WordPress

Published

on

In this WordPress tutorial, you’ll learn how to create the Tabber widget, which is very useful for when multiple widgets need to fit in a sidebar. It saves space and streamlines the appearance and functionality of your WordPress-powered website.

In the past, there were different methods of doing this, most of which were theme-dependent. As we’ll see in this tutorial, creating a tabbed widget that works on its own and with any theme is easily accomplished. So, let’s jump in and learn how to create our own Tabber widget, which we’ve made available for downloading at the end of this article.

create-tabber-widget-splash

Saving Sidebar Space

The main advantage of tabs is that you can fit more widgets into the sidebar. And tabs look good. The image below shows how much vertical space is taken up by three standard widgets (using the default Twenty Ten theme). The default layout is on the left, and our tabber widget is on the right:

tabber_example

Before We Start

A few things are useful to know. Because we are building a widget in this article, you might want to learn about WordPress’ Widgets API and how to create a basic widget:

Use these resources as needed while following the tutorial along.

The Basic Idea

The idea for this widget is simple: select a sidebar, and the Tabber widget will grab all of its widgets and display them as tabs. In the widget’s interface, you can select a sidebar, specify an extra CSS class and optionally apply your own styles. When enabled, the plugin will register an extra sidebar (which may be removed if you have other ways to add a sidebar). Then, using the same code, you can add more sidebars, and each of them can hold instances of the Tabber widget.

To control your widgets, Tabber uses idTabs for jQuery, created by Sean Catchpole, but you could always use another solution. Note that additional CSS is loaded to style the resulting widget.

So, the goal with Tabber is to transform any widget’s output into markup that can be used to display tabs

tags for this. Other themes may use complicated markup that can’t be predicted or successfully transformed into the output needed for tabs.

The solution to this problem is to intercept the widget’s parameters before rendering, and then to restructure them into useful structures using JavaScript or jQuery for the tabbed output. More on that later.

action. We register the widget on line 17.

Widget Interface
Widget interface.

The Main Tabber Widget Class

Tabber is a normal widget, and in this case it is located

SETTINGS: PLUGIN INTERFACE

The widget has two settings:

  • “sidebar”
    to hold the ID of the selected sidebar
  • “css”
    for extra CSS classes to style the Tabber widget

When selecting which sidebar to use, you must avoid using the sidebar that holds the Tabber widget. Otherwise, it will spin into endless recursion. To avoid this, before rendering the widget’s content, check whether the selected sidebar is the same as the parent sidebar. This can’t be prevented while the widget is set up, because the widget’s panel affords very little control over this.

Also, using sidebars that are not normally used is a good idea. To help with this, the plugin includes sample code to help you add an extra sidebar.

This function requires the name of the sidebar, and it will display all widgets in it. Line 9 contains the check mentioned before, to prevent recursion when displaying sidebar content if the selected sidebar is the same as the parent sidebar.

Lastly, the filter is removed, and any widgets belonging to other sidebars are displayed normally, without modification.

WIDGET MODIFICATION

To prepare for the transformation done with JavaScript, the tabber widget includes the

tag for the control tabs. After this filter, the widget’s output will look like this:

JavaScript For Widget Transformation

Once the widget’s presentation is modified, one thing remains: to complete the transformation and get the titles from the widgets and turn them into tabs:This code uses jQuery to get all of the Tabber widgets based on the

  • will hold only its content.

Final Tabber Example
Final Tabber example.

Finally, when all this is done, we enable idTabs to activate the tabs control. And with the default styling loaded from the

How To Install The Tabber Plugin

As with any other plugin, unpack it, upload it to WordPress’ plugins folder, and activate it from the plugins panel. When you go to the “Widgets” panel, you will see an additional sidebar, “Tabber Example Sidebar,” at the end on the right. And “Available Widgets” will show one more widget, “D4P Smashing Tabber.”

Add this new widget to the “Main Sidebar.” From the “Sidebar” widget drop-down menu, select “Tabber Example Sidebar,” and save the widget. Now, open the “Tabber Example Sidebar” and add the widgets you want to be displayed as tabs. You can add as many widgets as you want, but pay attention because if you add too many, the tab’s control will break to two or more lines, and it will not look pretty. Starting with two or three widgets is best.

Conclusion

Creating one widget to display several other widgets as a tab isn’t very difficult, as you can see. The trick is in adjusting the widgets’ output to a format that can be transformed into tabs, and then using JavaScript to display them. We’ve explored just one possible transformation method; you can always experiment with ways to rearrange widget elements.

We used idTabs here, but there are many methods of displaying tabs, and not all of them require JavaScript:

I prefer using a jQuery-based solution, and idTabs is very easy to use and easy to style and it works in all browsers. Check out other solutions, and see what extra features they offer to enhance your own tabbed widgets.

 

from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/08/27/a-tour-of-wordpress-4-0/

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14" font_style=”italic” color=”#474747" bgcolor=”#F5F5F5" bcolor=”#dd9933" arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote][/quote]>this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

Continue Reading

Life

The WordPress Theme Customizer

Published

on

In case you missed it, WordPress release 3.4 included a very exciting new development: the Theme Customizer. This allows users to tweak theme settings using a WYSIWYG interfaceand customize the theme so it includes the colors, fonts, text — and pretty much anything else — they want.

WordPress 3.4 allows you to make extensive customizations to a theme, including colors, fonts, and text.
WordPress 3.4 allows you to make extensive customizations to a theme, including colors, fonts, and text.

The purists out there may be throwing their hands up in horror — a WYSIWYG interface! Letting users alter themes themselves! Surely that opens the floodgates for the creation of thousands of ugly, messy WordPress websites? Well, yes, there is a risk of that. But more importantly, the Customizer means that if you’re developing custom themes for client websites, or themes for other developers to use, you have a whole new set of tools to play with.

With the Theme Customizer:

  • If you’re developing free or premium themes for others to use, integrating the Customizer will make your themes much more appealing to developers and website owners.
  • If you’re building client websites, you can let your client tweak the template content of their website such as the logo, tagline and contact details in a more intuitive way than by using a theme options page.
  • For both groups, you can let website users and developers make changes without having to rely on widgets or theme options pages — a less risky and less time-consuming approach.

So, let’s start by having a look at what the Theme Customizer is and how it works for the user.

How The Theme Customizer Works For Users

The Theme Customizer has been integrated into the Twenty Eleven Theme, so you can try it out using that theme. There’s a great video on the Ottopress blog showing you how the Customizer works with Twenty Eleven. Using it is simple:

  1. On the “Themes” page, search for and activate the Twenty Eleven Theme.
  2. On the same page, click on the “Customize” link under the current theme’s description.

The “Customize” link is right below the current theme's description on the “Themes” page.
The “Customize” link is right below the current theme’s description on the “Themes” page. Larger view.

  1. This brings up the Theme Customizer in the left column, along with a preview of your website on the right.

The theme customizer shown with the twenty eleven theme
The Customizer options are shown side-by-side with a preview of your website, so you can test the effect of changes. Larger view.

  1. To make changes, all you have to do is select each of the available options and edit their settings. The options are:
    • Site title and tagline
      Edit the title and tagline of the website without having to go to the “Settings” page.
    • Colors
      In the Twenty Eleven theme, you can only change the color of the header text and website background, but as we’ll see, this can potentially be used for much more.
    • Header image
      Choose from one of the default images or remove the header image altogether.
    • Background image
      Upload an image to use as the background of the website. The image below is what happens when I upload an image of some hang gliders to my website. The image can be tiled but unfortunately doesn’t stretch.

You can set your background image to tile, but not stretch.
You can set your background image to tile, but not stretch. Larger view.

    • Navigation
      Select which menu you want to use for the primary navigation of your website.
    • Static Front Page
      Specify whether the front page of the website should be a listing of your latest posts, or a static page of your choosing.
  1. Once you’ve made the changes you want, you must click the “Save & Publish” button. Until this is clicked, none of the changes are reflected in the live website. This means you can play to your heart’s content without your visitors seeing your experiments.

Another really exciting way to use the customizer is when previewing themes. If a theme has the Customizer built in, you can use it to make tweaks before downloading and activating the theme.

This demonstrates the Customizer in action with the Twenty Eleven theme, but what about your own themes? How would you harness this to add more functionality in themes you are selling or developing for clients?

So let’s take a look at how to implement Customizer in your theme, and how to add your own customization options.

 

 

from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/03/05/the-wordpress-theme-customizer-a-developers-guide/

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14" font_style=”italic” color=”#474747" bgcolor=”#F5F5F5" bcolor=”#dd9933" arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote][/quote]>this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

Continue Reading

Entertainment

What would it Take for WordPress to Lose Dominance?

Published

on

What would it Take for WordPress to Lose Dominance?
635573096031001468-USP-NCAA-Basketball-Pittsburgh-at-Duke

this is caption

 

WordPress 4.1 Release Candidate is now available for download which includes the new default theme Twenty Fifteen, you can read about what else is new with it here. Or download it here. I love this new default theme, a huge step back in the right direction ( I thought Twenty Fourteen was awful ). A nice clean design, optimised nicely for mobile devices and good typography – this is how it should be done.

There was an interesting discussion on the WPTavern comments of this post, where Jeff asks what it would take for WordPress to lose it’s dominance. I found point 5 rather funny “A huge scandal takes place involving Automattic, the WordPress Foundation and those close to the project.” I just cant see WordPress being taken over for many years to come – it’s too far ahead at this point, sort of like the Facebook of CMS’s. Too many large companies rely on it to see it fail and I just don’t see anything at the momement that could even come close. I did a post recently about this, WordPress competitors, but none came close to what we have with WordPress. I think we’re all safe for a bit!

from :http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/creating-child-themes-for-your-wordpress-theme-framework–cms-21933

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14" font_style=”italic” color=”#474747" bgcolor=”#F5F5F5" bcolor=”#dd9933" arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote][/quote]this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress  templates

Continue Reading

Categories

Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

ABUJA MAN REVEALS (FREE) SECRET FRUITS THAT INCREASED MANHOOD AND LASTING POWER IN 7DAYS

 

… CLICK HERE TO GET IT!

 

 

 

BUA Adverts

Trending

%d bloggers like this: