Connect with us

     

Arts & Entertainments

I like Kim Kardashian’s style – Makanjuola

Published

on

I like Kim Kardashian’s style – Makanjuola

Funke Makanjuola is the CEO of FunFash Haven and the pioneer of ankara shoes/bag. In this interview with Deborah Ocheni, the highly innovative fashion designer whose passion for fashion is a function of her family background spoke about her fashion philosophy, the gap she hopes to fill in fashion industry and sundry issues.

 

What do you think of ankara shoes and bag?

 

They are super cool. I’m a fan and I must say a pioneer of ankara bags and shoes. I started making them as a kid in 1999 before I ever saw it anywhere. My neighbour was getting married and my elder sisters didn’t get the asoebi, so I took some pieces from the tailor close to my house where some of the neighbours took their clothes to and stuck them to some old shoes of my sisters and also used super glue then, to cover some purses with the fabric and I covered some earrings and bracelets. And that was how the journey began.

 

Would you say fashion business is lucrative enough?

 

Yes it is. You just need to understand the market and know how the system works.

 

Are you satisfied with your choice of business?

 

Yes I am. For me, fashion is innate and I believe it is my calling and also, where I can add the most value to the world around me.

 

What inspired you into fashion business?

 

My grandmother did. I remember as a child of about five years old, on a Sunday morning, we were about to go to church and my grandmother wore this elegant white dress but it was too plain. She knew there was something wrong and she wasn’t really feeling her outfit so I decided to help out by adding an umph to the dress. I cut out some roses from my dress and I sewed them into the neck of her dress (with her help of course). The drastic change was unbelievable. The dress came alive and the smile on my grandmother’s face was priceless. I’ll never forget how that made me feel. From then, I made up my mind to make people feel good by making them look good because “When you look good, you feel good.” The world is filled with depression, pain, and all sorts of ills. I just want to change the world in my own little way by making people look good and invariably making them feel good. The ripple effect of that is you ultimately do well. That was my inspiration into fashion.

 

What is your personal style?

 

I’d love to say I apply the minimalist theory. Less is best. I am elegant in simplicity. But I can go a little overboard and very loud sometimes, as occasion warrants.

 

How do you source for your fabrics?

 

I travel to get them myself, networking and sometimes online.

 

Are clients sensitive to this?

 

Very well

 

Do you have any specific research    process when you start new collections?

 

Yes, I do a lot of research

 

Was there anyone in your family who made you develop interest in fashion business?

 

Yes. My grandmother who saw and appreciated what I was doing as a child.

 

Who inspires you the most in fashion industry?

 

I have a lot but let’s go with Mai Atafo

 

Where do you see yourself in five years time?

 

I see myself in Vogue and Forbes respectively and also owning a great fashion conglomerate

 

Are you a fan of ankara prints?

 

Absolutely

 

What is your take on African traditional wears?

 

They are super cool

 

Do you consider any fashion item indispensable?

 

Jewellery

 

How easily do you get your fashion items in Nigeria?

 

It’s quite easy because I have my supply links

 

While shopping, which fashion item catches your fancy?

 

 

Zips and pearls

 

Which fashion accessories do you live for?

 

Rings and sunshades

 

Do you conform to trends?

 

Not really. I set my own trend.

 

How comfortable do you feel in jeans and T-shirt?

 

 

I feel super comfy. But I love to be sassier and a little more edgy most times.

 

What makes a woman well dressed?

 

Confidence

 

Whose celebrity style do you like most?

 

Kim Kardashian

 

Fashion wise, do you have a role model?

 

I have quite a number

 

Is there anything you are unlikely to be caught wearing?

 

Baggy jeans, big shirts, flared skirts, just   anything oversized

 

What is your ready to go outfits?

 

Bodycon dresses and heels or boots

 

When it comes to fashion, would you say your physique works to your advantage?

 

Yes

 

Which outfits take up most space in your wardrobe?

 

Fur jackets

 

What is your costliest fashion possession? How much did you get it?

 

A custom made dress at N395,000 (I didn’t pay for it though)

 

How do you love your shoes?

 

To die for

 

What determines what you wear?

 

My mood, weather and occasion

 

What do you think of modern designers?

 

Awesome. Daring I must say

 

Who is your best designer?

 

I love Versace

 

Do you have a signature perfume?

 

Yes. Intimately Beckham and Avon’s little black dress

 

Do you have any fashion obsession? Sunshades

 

How did you come up with your brand name and what is the message behind it?

 

Me brand name was coined from my name Funke(Fun) and it connotes FUN literally, Fashion (Fash). It simply means having fun with fashion. There’s no hard and fast rule to fashion. Just own it, look good and have fun. There’s so much drama with tailors and most clients get fed up and are just looking for that one place that will cater to their fashion needs without stress. Hence, the name Haven which means a place of refuge or rest. So we decided to come up with a name to depict what we are all about, elegance, fun and ease. It’s fashion with a touch of fun and a place of fashion refuge. Where you can come to, and have solutions to your fashion needs

 

Fashion market seems saturated, how do you intend to keep afloat?

 

Our products are absolutely unique, quality driven, artistically inclined which makes them fun to wear, innovative and inventive. With originality and creativity being our core, we pay attention to details which gives our products that perfect finishing everyone craves. Our products are based on vogue, style and most importantly, quality. A lot of designers feel quality is highly overrated and go for quantity and profit. This makes our products outstanding because to us, quality can never be over emphasized. We are people-oriented and business-inclined therefore we give our customers value for their money. FUNFASH products reflect quality, originality, and creativity. Therefore, when a markup is placed on our products, customers are willing to pay the premium and pick our products rather than other products because of the perceived value and quality guarantee that comes with our products. In this line of business, competition is unavoidable but our market is vast, cutting across the globe with a population of over 7 billion, there’s always a market for our high value products.

 

Does your background influence who you are now?

 

To a large extent, yes. I come from a family with a long pedigree of fashion prowess. My grandmother was a fashionista and a tailor. Likewise my mother and so many other family members

Continue Reading
Advertisement
2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. protosmasher

    June 18, 2019 at 5:59 pm

    Valuable information. Lucky me I found your web site by accident, and I’m shocked why this accident did not happened earlier! I bookmarked it.

  2. Like

    January 5, 2019 at 9:06 am

    Like!! I blog frequently and I really thank you for your content. The article has truly peaked my interest.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Arts & Entertainments

I’ve not had my biggest breakthrough yet – Sola Allyson

Published

on

I’ve not had my  biggest breakthrough yet  – Sola Allyson

Sola Allyson is an elegant singer and music instructor, popular for recording the soundtrack of a Yoruba movie, Eji-Owuro. Her music is poetic and unique even as it evokes memories of folklore, which serves as a central part of our upbringing as Africans. One asset which you can’t take away from the soft-spoken singer is her sonorous voice. The award-winning singer in this interview with EDWIN USOBOH, talks about her music, family life and her penchant for always dressing African…

 

 

What have you been doing of late?

At the moment I am preparing for my latest album and the title is ‘Iri’. It would be my 8th album. It has lot of moving anointed songs just like my other previous album has got.

As a gospel artiste do you see singing as industry or ministry?

It is an industry! Because we are ‘churchfying’ everything, it is a music industry, for me as a Christian, in the bible there is nothing like gospel music, instead music in the spiritual songs. So it is through the human system that one identifies a particular music as gospel music, but every song comes from the spirit. Bro Pasuma sings from the abundant of his heart same goes for Saidi Osupa, Shako Rashidi etc…

I charge money for the music I make, it is a gift and I also went to school to study music. To put it simply, this is my career; it is my dream and my everything all together, so it is a segment of the music industry.

Is it possible for one to be a gospel singer without being born again?

No! You have to be born again to sing a gospel music. I cannot speak for others, I can only attest for myself. Gospel music is like a pathway that shows people to God and you cannot lead someone to where you yourself have not found. Another thing is we do not know God at once, we are always learning, we are always getting better. The part of the righteous is like shinning light that shines brighter and brighter until it perfects day; nobody can know it all, you cannot claim to come and tell me about the God you don’t know about. That is why my music would be a little different because I am speaking from my understanding that I have from God. That is why my music passes across to everyone; a Muslim could listen to my music and when you listen to my music you will put your attention upward.

Are you an inspirational singer or a gospel singer?

I am a singer, the bible says by their fruit you shall know them. So what happens is I leave it to the listener to say what my music means to them, but my own idea is that I make sure every song that comes out from my mouth draws people’s attention to God. God is God; the only difference here is the way we understand Him.

As spiritual singer, do you think you are doing enough?

Nobody does enough, but with time and devotion you will get better daily.

What influences your music?

My music is influenced by life experiences, my faith with God, my life journey. When you listen to my music you have an idea of the kind of work I deal with, the length and breadth of everything is that God is good and He is faithful. Whatever comes your way do not lose hope, keep hope alive. God is good.

Can you do other genres of music?

I do different genres of music. There is the stylistic feature and the lyrical feature for the kind of music that we do. When you say genre it could be gospel, hip-hop and others. Someone can pick up an hip-hop and make gospel music with it. These days there are visions for everything, some people would tell you they are doing gospel and when you listen to the song it sounds like a music Wizkid produced. We use the same style but different lyrics, it is the style that we call gospel music that people listen to and get closer to God.

Have you always wanted to be a musician?

It is not like I wanted to be musician but I have always known that I would be a person of influence. My journey to the music line kept unfolding and unfolding till we got to this point and here we are.

Looking back was there any time you were contemplating leaving the gospel music?

It was not just leaving the gospel music but leaving music generally, when I had financial issues during the start of my career in music. I guess it is true what they say that at every point of your life, one has to face this challenges.

What will you consider your biggest breakthrough as a musician?

I have not had a biggest breakthrough yet.

Which of your albums would you say has made you popularly?

You know it depends on the way you look at your gift, I don’t define myself by what people define me by, I don’t go by the idea of the attention they give to stars, if you meet me along the way I would deny my identity.

Do you consider yourself a celebrity?

People say I am, and I consider myself as one. You might not see me ordinarily and see a celebrity in me.  Left for me I want to live my life to honour God, it is as simple as that.

What is your passion?

My passion is making people get better, encouraging people.

What is your style signature?

My style signature is simple and portable.

What is your advice for the youth, with the rate of suicide happening now?

I think it is the older generation that is responsible for that. They did not allow these children struggle, we all bury our ideas on the saying: ‘I will not want my children to go through the suffering I went through’ and by this statement, we intend to over-pampered them and mistakenly do not inculcate the right values in them. When they get into the world and they are facing challenges they become impatient and want to get it all.

Your music is always very deep and sometimes you get so emotional…

Music is a calling for me and I sing with all that is within and with the fact that I have passed through a lot of things it goes with my song. When you have deeper understanding of life you will get emotional, when you listen to my music. Maybe, if I had not gone through all those challenges that I have faced earlier in life I would not be who I am today.

What lesson has life taught you?

Life has taught me to be true and be yourself, do not try to be like anybody. There is always something in you that the other person is also looking for.

Why are you so attached to Luli Concert, are you one of the pioneers?

I am not one of the people that constituted this event. I was invited as an artistes, it has been revealed to me a long time ago, the stage, the event, and all these activities that are being held, today in a dream I had some years back. So, it looks like a recap of the dream. I decided to plug in this event because of my dream.

I cannot write the story of my life without the Celestial Church of Christ, it has been a major chapter in the story of my life so I make myself available for every platform of this church and most importantly it is because I know I could be a blessing to many souls at a particular event. We know that the gift of God is in born and His plan for everyone’s life He knows, but there is somewhere you get to that your dreams get shaped. So I had a perfect idea of who exactly I am supposed to be, so if you want to call me one of the people that constituted this event I will not disagrees because literally I have participated greatly in this event.

What are the attributes that drew you to the Luli Concert?

Because it is strictly a worship concert. The Celestial Church of God that I passed through is centred around worship, when you attend the service you will know that we do more of praises and worship, you do not need to compare anybody with another person, because God is one, the difference is in the way that we understand God and in the way that you can connect with him. It is the identity, the mode and worship of cele that is why I believe in the God they serve.

What would be your message to those people…

We are going to continue to worship God and as simple as possible just open your heart to God during the worship.

Can you elaborate on how the Celestial Church of God has played a major role in your life

It is a long story, they have come through in many areas of my life, and time will not permit me to say all.

Continue Reading

Arts & Entertainments

Why I call my husband ‘baby’ –Regina Daniels

Published

on

Why I call my husband ‘baby’ –Regina Daniels

Popular Nollywood actress, Regina Daniels, has explained why she married Nigerian politician and business, Ned Nwoko.

The marriage, which was contracted in April, was widely criticised on social media because of the 38-year age gap between the couple.

“I don’t think I could have married someone of my age because I am quite stubborn, very stubborn, my head is not down but with my husband that is not the case because I respect him a lot,” she noted.

The 20-year-old actress revealed this in a YouTube video interview, which was conducted in Dubai where the actress is currently holidaying with her husband.

It is also the first time the actress would agree to publicly speak about her marriage.

During the interview, Mr. Nwoko, the Nigerian politician who married the actress as his 6th wife also spoke about his love story with Regina.

He said: “Some people thought I met her (Regina) through her mother. We met, fell in love and got married within three weeks.”

When asked if she was not bothered about the public uproar that trailed her marriage, Regina said: “The only thing I was worried about when he proposed was how I was going to tell my family and not what the public will say or think. I have learned a lot from him. I call him ‘baby’. I used to cook but my husband has stopped me from entering the kitchen, If enter the kitchen he’ll say stupid girl why are you cooking, you have cooks ” she said.

Her husband, Ned Nwoko, justified why he doesn’t allow her to cook by adding that added that “ but I need her time for other things”.

The couple also revealed that they both share common interests including a love for swimming.

Mr Nwoko said: “I taught her how to swim and I learnt under 20 minutes. I have taught over 700 people how to swim in the last four years. It is my passion that’s why I’m building a sports university as you might know.”

He also gave a sneak-peek into his private life.

“I don’t drink alcohol, I don’t eat meat or chicken. I am a Muslim, a lot of people don’t know this. I converted when I was schooling in England. I am not religious but I believe in values and ethos that is what should guide everyone’s conscience,” he revealed.

Continue Reading

Arts & Entertainments

I discovered my son’s blindness four months after birth – Cobhams Asuquo’s wife

Published

on

I discovered my son’s blindness four months after birth – Cobhams Asuquo’s wife

Wife of Cobhams Asuquo, Nigeran-born songwriter, Ojuolape Asuquo, has broken the silence on how she discovered about her son’s blindness four months after birth.

She disclosed this in the latest episode of Tito Idakula‘s vlog ‘My Jesus Experience’, where she chronicled her Christian life and foray into marriage.

Ojuolape, explained that she felt a cloud of uneasiness hovering over her when her son was pronounced blind by doctors both local and those outside the country.

In the emotion-riddled video, she narrated how she lost her struggles to correct the blindness of her son, even after several efforts.

According to her, she was shocked the doctor told her during one of her routine visits to the hospital that her son’s eyes were “not following”.

“Everything was so smooth. And then fast forward to four months after my son was born and the doctor was like ‘his eyes are not following’ and I was like, ‘What do you mean he’s not following?,’ she asked.

“And then suddenly, as a mother, your heart just starts palpitating.”

The situation, she said, “brought a lot of fear.” “It’s a mixture of emotions,” she said while revealing events leading to the eventual blindness of her son.

She also disclosed that her son’s blindness made her ask loads of questions about her spiritual life.

“I asked myself: Is it happening to me? Am I in a nightmare? What’s happening? I still feel like till day,” Ojuolape said.

She, however, stated that she had moved on, noting that the development had further strengthened her faith in God.

She added that her boldness to share her experience in the video was indicative of how well she has been able to manage the traumatic feelings that came with her son’s blindness.

Urging others to borrow a leaf from her case, Ojuolape said genuinely serving entails being ready to brace the odds. She enjoined others passing through challenging not to lose their faith in God.

CobhamThe couple got married in 2010.

Ojuolape’s marriage to Asuquo has been a source of inspiration to many, with the happily married couple always seen flaunting the family pictures online.

Her husband, who is also blind, has also continued to pull the strings with his creativity as a songwriter/music producer/singer.

Continue Reading

Arts & Entertainments

Wizkid, 2Baba, Tiwa Savage to storm Dubai for One Africa Music Fest

Published

on

Wizkid, 2Baba, Tiwa Savage to storm Dubai for One Africa Music Fest

Ayodeji Balogun, better known as Wizkid, and Innocent Idibia, better known as 2Baba, alongside other African artistes are set to hit Dubai with the best of Afro-music at One Africa Music Festival.

The music fiesta is slated to hold on November 15 at the Festival Arena, Dubai.

Other stars listed to perform at the show include Tiwa Savage, Tekno, Burna Boy, Zlatan Ibile, Kcee and Teni, fast-rising female singer.

Also on the list are Vanessa Mdee and Diamond Platnumz, Tanzanian singers; Souhila Lachhab from Algeria; Eddy Kenz, Ugandan singer; as well as Nhatty Man and LiJ Michael, both from Ethiopia.

Bankole Wellington, sensational singer and actor known as Banky W, will host the event with Jah Prayzah, Zimbabwean ace singer, while Benjamin Mugisha, Rwandan singer and songwriter better known by his stage name, ‘The Ben’, is expected to also perform.

The event is organised by Interswitch, payment processing company; Air Peace and GTB, among other sponsors.

According to the organisers, the One Africa Music Fest, now its second edition, is a platform to showcase Africa’s best and brightest talents to position the continent within the entertainment industry on a global level.

The event is meant to promote African music, create awareness, stimulate demand, develop audiences and promote sustainability for African music globally.

It is also aimed at securing collaborations between African music artists, businesses and communities, among other social connections.

Continue Reading

Arts & Entertainments

Looking at my daughter brings back memories – Yul Edochie gushes

Published

on

Looking at my daughter brings back memories – Yul Edochie gushes

Nollywood actor Yul Edochie has gushed about his first child, Danielle, on social media. The talented actor shared his daughter’s photo on his Instagram page and celebrated her.

In his post, the actor expressed that anytime he looks at his 14-year-old daughter she brings back so many memories to him.

He revealed that the most prominent memory is the fact that he was broke at the time she was born 14 years ago.

The actor also thanked God on his post, saying that he found focus and strength to build on his life with the glory of God.

Edochie shared a photo of his 14-year-old daughter sitting on the floor at home while she was studying. In the photo, books and stationeries were all around her.

The talented actor, who is named after popular Russian actor Yul Brynner, veteran Nigerian actor Pete Edochie from Anambra state.

The actor recently celebrated his mother for her impact in his life. The actor talked about how his mother had predicted his future many years ago.

Continue Reading

Arts & Entertainments

Charly Boy to perform at Felabration on Sunday

Published

on

Charly Boy to perform at Felabration on Sunday

Charles Oputa, veteran entertainer and activist better known as Charly Boy, is set to perform at the 2019 annual Felabration fiesta, a week-long celebration of the life and times of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti.

The event, which started on October 14, will come to an end on the 20, at the new Afrika Shrine in Lagos, with both local and international artistes slated to perform.

In a video shared on his social media page, Charly Boy said he was set to perform alongside other artistes at the grand-finale of the fiesta on Sunday.

According to the 68-year-old showbiz maestro, who released his debut highlife album over three decades ago and recently returned to the stage, his performance was in the spirit of immortalising Fela’s ideas.

The former president of the Performing Musicians Association of Nigeria (PMAN), who recently announced the loss of his mum, said he will also present his latest songs at the show.

“Make a date with me, alongside other great Nigerian artistes on Sunday Oct. 20, as we all gather together to give honour to whom honour is due, the legendary baba Fela Anikulapo-Kuti,” he wrote.

“Come listen to my new tunes as we all gather if we can find a cure to our mumu.”

This year’s edition, tagged “From Lagos with Love”, opened on Monday at Neca Hall with a talk show on the topic: ‘Teacher don’t teach me nonsense’.

The panel includes Bobi Wine, Ugandan singer and politician; Chimamanda Ngozi-Adichie and Wole Soyinka; award-winning writers, and Akala, British rapper.

Continue Reading

Arts & Entertainments

Whitney Houston, Notorious B.I.G get nomination for Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Published

on

Whitney Houston, Notorious B.I.G get nomination for Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has announced late American international music legends, Whitney Houston and Notorious B.I.G  among its inductees for the 35th annual Hall of Fame ceremony, years after their death.

According to US Today, the Rock Hall announced Houston and the legendary rapper B.I.G among nine first-time nominees and 16 overall under consideration for induction for the 2020 edition holding in May in Cleveland, United States.

Their nominations honour artistes who both died young, as Houston was 48 when she drowned in a Beverly Hills hotel bathtub and B.I.G was just 24 when he was killed in a drive-by shooting.

Joining Houston and B.I.G as first-time nominees are the Dave Matthews Band, the Doobie Brothers, Motörhead, Pat Benatar, Soundgarden, T. Rex and Thin Lizzy.

Returning nominees include Depeche Mode, Judas Priest, Kraftwerk, MC5, Nine Inch Nails, Rufus featuring Chaka Khan and Todd Rundgren.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is a museum and hall of fame, established in 1983 and is located in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, on the shore of Lake Erie.

It documents the history of rock music and the artistes, producers, engineers, and other notable figures that have influenced its development.

To be eligible for nomination, an artiste or band must have released its first commercial recording at least 25 years before the year of nomination.

After the nominees are announced, ballots will be sent to more than 1,000 artistes, historians and members of the music industry, who will consider an act’s career work, influence on other artists, innovation and skill as they vote.

The 2020 inductees will be announced in January and the next ceremony will take place in Cleveland on Saturday May 2, 2020.

News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that Whitney Houston, the daughter of gospel star Cissy Houston, was born into a musical family on August 9, 1963, in Newark, New Jersey.

She was an international superstar singing diva, with her debut album, ‘Whitney Houston’, released in 1985 and became the biggest-selling album by a debut artist.

Her several hit singles include ‘Saving All My Love For You’, ‘How Will I Know’, ‘You Give Good Love’, and ‘The Greatest Love of All’

Houston was married to singer Bobby Brown with whom she had her only child Bobbi Kristina Brown, 22, who had also passed on July 26, 2015.

She was a Multi-Grammy Award winning singer, with an unequalled run of seven consecutive number one records (1980s), and held number one spot on Billboard’s Hot 100 for 14 weeks with “I Will Always Love You”.

In 2009, Guinness World Records cited her as the most awarded female act of all time.

She was found dead in her hotel room at the Beverly Hills, California, on February 11, 2012 at 48 years.

Late rapper Notorious B.I.G, the only child of Jamaican immigrant parents, was born Christopher George Latore Wallace  on May 21, 1972 and raised in the Brooklyn  borough of New York City.

His debut album Ready to Die (1994) made him a central figure in East Coast hip hop and increased New York City’s visibility in the genre at a time when West Coast hip hop dominated the mainstream.

The Notorious B.I.G. was noted for his “loose, easy flow”, dark, semi-autobiographical lyrics and storytelling abilities, which focused on crime and hardship.

He was married to singer Faith Evans, and they had a son, before his murder by an unknown assailant in a drive-by shooting in Los Angeles on March 9, 1997.

His second album, “Life after Death”, released two weeks after his death, rose to number one on the U.S. album charts.

In 2000, the album became one of the few hip-hop albums to be certified Diamond.

Continue Reading

Arts & Entertainments

Point of View: Experts ponder on raising capital against high value artworks

Published

on

Point of View: Experts ponder on raising capital against high value artworks

T

he value of artworks by Nigerian artists sold at African art auctions increased to $5,539,648 (2017) from $3,794,924 (2016) and $2,990,395 (2015), with Sotheby’s 2017 entry into the field of modern and contemporary African accounting for $1,345,631 from a single sale of 15 works by Nigerian artists.

 

 

No doubt, with this unprecedented growth, several questions arise, among which are: How do we establish a reliable value of an art work? How do we transform the market for art from Nigeria and embark on new directions in art lending, investment and wealth management? What are the challenges and risks? How do we develop appropriate regulatory and legal frameworks?

 

 

Thus, ‘Raising Capital Against High Value Works of Art’ which is the focus of the second edition ‘Point of View’, a monthly series talks by The Ben Enwonwu Foundation, seeks to encourage the growing recognition of Nigerian art as a new alternative asset class while providing a deeper understanding of the appraising of art holdings for liquidation, and of using art as collateral for lending transactions such as financing business expansions and investments or high-end purchases. It also aims to support the development of art investment products, as well as the diversification of investment portfolios with the integration of art.

 

 

The event which is organised by Ben Enwonwu Foundation in collaboration with the Society of Nigerian Artists will hold tomorrow, Thursday October 17, at Alliance Française/Mike Adenuga Centre, Ikoyi, Lagos.

 

 

“Drawing from other creative disciplines and experiences to take a broad helicopter view of the art scene in Nigeria and Africa, ‘Point of View’ aims to encourage support and funding for the visual arts through public and private sector partnership while ensuring continuing artist’s professional development and empowerment,” the Foundation stated in a release announcing the event.

 

 

“Conceived as a collaborative platform, the second edition of ‘Point of View’ titled ‘Raising Capital Against High Value Works of Art’ brings together a diverse line-up of artists, curators, writers, thinkers, wealth managers and policy makers. It is informed by mounting global interest on art from the continent and a steady growth of the collectors’ base within Africa and especially in Nigeria.”

 

 

Speakers include Bola Asiru, Principal, Sub-Saharan Africa MasterCard Advisors Business and Co-Founder, Red Door Gallery; and Tayo Fagbule, Chairman, Editorial Board at BusinessDay. Panellists on the evening are; Prof. Koyinsola Ajayi SAN, Managing Partner, Olaniwun Ajayi LP; Nigeria’s leading art collector and founder, Omooba Yemisi Adedoyin Shyllon Foundation (OYASAF), Omooba Yemisi Adedoyin Shyllon; Chief Executive Officer,  Arthouse Contemporary Limited, Kavita Chellaram; and Managing Partner, Coronation Capital, John Opubor. 

 

 

This event is sponsored by Mydrim Gallery and Red Door Gallery, and supported by Alliance Française/Mike Adenuga Centre, Ikoyi, Lagos, Jackson Etti & Edu, Lagos Paris Art, Hundids Magazine, Connect Nigeria, The Sole Adventurer, Onobello and Omenka.

 

Point of View was launched on September 17, 2019 with ‘A Case for the Artist’s Resale Right’. It centred on the implementation of resale royalty rights for Nigerian visual artists as recognised by the Berne convention for the protection of literary and Artistic works.

 

 

The Ben Enwonwu Foundation (BEF) was established in 2003 in honour of the celebrated Nigerian artist, Professor Benedict Chukwukadibia Enwonwu MBE, NNOM (1917-94). The Foundation aims to sustain and build on his life and works through which he forged a philosophical basis for contemporary Nigerian art by fusing Western techniques and indigenous traditions.

 

 

In 2004, the Foundation started its distinguished lecture series, which has become a major gathering for the rich diversity of contemporary Nigerian society. It offers an opportunity for national and international leaders, renowned academics and policy makers to share their understanding and perspectives on the role of art in causing desirable societal changes while contributing to nation building and economic empowerment.

 

 

Through scholarships and grants, The Ben Enwonwu Foundation supports research, exhibitions and publications that foster innovative and scholarly artistic expression. Previous beneficiaries of the scheme include students of Yaba College of Technology, Ahmadu Bello University, Obafemi Awolowo University and the University of Lagos.

 

 

In furtherance of its objectives, the Foundation opened an art centre in the artist’s home to promote research into his practice. The centre’s year-round educational programme explores Enwonwu’s art practice, the cultural and social context of his work and links to contemporary themes. The centre also houses leading gallery, Omenka, which represents a select number of African and international artists while examining in an experimental and research-minded way, contemporary art developments and discourses in Nigeria.

Currently, the Foundation is embarking on several projects, which include publishing a catalogue raisonné of Enwonwu’s works, as well as autobiography, lectures and writings on contemporary African art.

Continue Reading

Arts & Entertainments

Point of View: Experts ponder on raising capital against high value artworks

Published

on

Point of View: Experts ponder on raising capital against high value artworks

T

he value of artworks by Nigerian artists sold at African art auctions increased to $5,539,648 (2017) from $3,794,924 (2016) and $2,990,395 (2015), with Sotheby’s 2017 entry into the field of modern and contemporary African accounting for $1,345,631 from a single sale of 15 works by Nigerian artists.

 

 

No doubt, with this unprecedented growth, several questions arise, among which are: How do we establish a reliable value of an art work? How do we transform the market for art from Nigeria and embark on new directions in art lending, investment and wealth management? What are the challenges and risks? How do we develop appropriate regulatory and legal frameworks?

 

 

Thus, ‘Raising Capital Against High Value Works of Art’ which is the focus of the second edition ‘Point of View’, a monthly series talks by The Ben Enwonwu Foundation, seeks to encourage the growing recognition of Nigerian art as a new alternative asset class while providing a deeper understanding of the appraising of art holdings for liquidation, and of using art as collateral for lending transactions such as financing business expansions and investments or high-end purchases. It also aims to support the development of art investment products, as well as the diversification of investment portfolios with the integration of art.

 

 

The event which is organised by Ben Enwonwu Foundation in collaboration with the Society of Nigerian Artists will hold tomorrow, Thursday October 17, at Alliance Française/Mike Adenuga Centre, Ikoyi, Lagos.

 

“Drawing from other creative disciplines and experiences to take a broad helicopter view of the art scene in Nigeria and Africa, ‘Point of View’ aims to encourage support and funding for the visual arts through public and private sector partnership while ensuring continuing artist’s professional development and empowerment,” the Foundation stated in a release announcing the event.

 

“Conceived as a collaborative platform, the second edition of ‘Point of View’ titled ‘Raising Capital Against High Value Works of Art’ brings together a diverse line-up of artists, curators, writers, thinkers, wealth managers and policy makers. It is informed by mounting global interest on art from the continent and a steady growth of the collectors’ base within Africa and especially in Nigeria.”

 

 

Speakers include Bola Asiru, Principal, Sub-Saharan Africa MasterCard Advisors Business and Co-Founder, Red Door Gallery; and Tayo Fagbule, Chairman, Editorial Board at BusinessDay. Panellists on the evening are; Prof. Koyinsola Ajayi SAN, Managing Partner, Olaniwun Ajayi LP; Nigeria’s leading art collector and founder, Omooba Yemisi Adedoyin Shyllon Foundation (OYASAF), Omooba Yemisi Adedoyin Shyllon; Chief Executive Officer,  Arthouse Contemporary Limited, Kavita Chellaram; and Managing Partner, Coronation Capital, John Opubor. 

 

This event is sponsored by Mydrim Gallery and Red Door Gallery, and supported by Alliance Française/Mike Adenuga Centre, Ikoyi, Lagos, Jackson Etti & Edu, Lagos Paris Art, Hundids Magazine, Connect Nigeria, The Sole Adventurer, Onobello and Omenka.

 

 

Point of View was launched on September 17, 2019 with ‘A Case for the Artist’s Resale Right’. It centred on the implementation of resale royalty rights for Nigerian visual artists as recognised by the Berne convention for the protection of literary and Artistic works.

 

 

The Ben Enwonwu Foundation (BEF) was established in 2003 in honour of the celebrated Nigerian artist, Professor Benedict Chukwukadibia Enwonwu MBE, NNOM (1917-94). The Foundation aims to sustain and build on his life and works through which he forged a philosophical basis for contemporary Nigerian art by fusing Western techniques and indigenous traditions.

 

 

In 2004, the Foundation started its distinguished lecture series, which has become a major gathering for the rich diversity of contemporary Nigerian society. It offers an opportunity for national and international leaders, renowned academics and policy makers to share their understanding and perspectives on the role of art in causing desirable societal changes while contributing to nation building and economic empowerment.

 

 

Through scholarships and grants, The Ben Enwonwu Foundation supports research, exhibitions and publications that foster innovative and scholarly artistic expression. Previous beneficiaries of the scheme include students of Yaba College of Technology, Ahmadu Bello University, Obafemi Awolowo University and the University of Lagos.

 

 

In furtherance of its objectives, the Foundation opened an art centre in the artist’s home to promote research into his practice. The centre’s year-round educational programme explores Enwonwu’s art practice, the cultural and social context of his work and links to contemporary themes. The centre also houses leading gallery, Omenka, which represents a select number of African and international artists while examining in an experimental and research-minded way, contemporary art developments and discourses in Nigeria.

 

 

Currently, the Foundation is embarking on several projects, which include publishing a catalogue raisonné of Enwonwu’s works, as well as autobiography, lectures and writings on contemporary African art.

Continue Reading

Literature

Two stars and twinkles of love

Published

on

Two stars and twinkles of love

Book title: Boom Boom 

 

 

Author: Jude Idada

 

 

 

 

Publisher: Winepress Publishing

 

 

Pagination: 228

 

Year of publication: 2019

 

 

Reviewer: Adeniyi Taiwo Kunnu

 

 

T

he reality of being a channel for lives transcends the two who primarily account for their birth. This role calls for a deeper-than-the surface consideration as that is the zenith of such arduous task. Through the eyes of an eight year old, and the significant representation by his five year old sibling, not forgetting an animal, the author brings to life what appears as child’s play, then an enthralling tale and later an immersion, typical of unconscious literary baptism that has an allusion to the Jordan River documentation.

 

 

The clear indication of how ‘personal’ this work turns emanates from the narrative person in which it is communicated. Osaik, also known as Osasunwen Ikpowonsa Osagie unveils an ordeal, depicting a topsy-turvy situation as it affects the health of two members of his family – the first person being his mother and the second, his younger sister – Eghe Boom Boom, whose full name is Aiguobamsimwim Osagie.  The author goes inches further, by establishing the element of the super-sensible when Kompa, a dog, serves as clairvoyant, and at other times a source of succor and the very definition of true, yet rare friendship.

 

 

How relevant this book is hinges to what is often not dwelt upon by many writers of Children’s Literature. It is understood that children love fables and moonlight tales, but the age of knowledge attests to the wide-spread access to learning tools, which must take cognizance of the familiarity that many need to have, with what truly bedevils a non-negligible percentage of Nigerians – Sickle Cell Anaemia.

 

 

The author, by dwelling on an adjudged pressing concern has shown that nothing should be too knotty for a child, as far as it is matter of life and the after-life. Osaik’s gift in this fiction becomes the useful thread which connects the entire story.  An eight year old who understands the language of animals is the apt representation of the fantasy experiences that children revel in. Children in their purity often display ‘larger than life’ capacities, occasioned by what they watch, and in this work, it is evidently impressed.

 

 

Notably, the acculturation of the kids in the Osagie home comes up for a deliberate consideration, being an important sub-theme in this work. When parents nurture their children rightly, the same becomes their anthem in public engagements.

 

 

‘Boom Boom’ is Onomatopoeic as the title of a work, reminding one of such sound made when there is a blast from an explosion, but here, another kind of sound is being made. It is a shift from denotative to a connotative deployment. In this wise,  ‘sound’ of pains and accompanying losses to about 20% of 200 million strong population of Nigeria; a ‘sound’ that resonates into spaces and vales where love choices and lack of knowledge plunge countless numbers into making more lives miserable. It is indeed a sound made to evangelize those whose inclination refuses the fact of what obtains in comprehensible term.

 

 

In Osaik’s words: “I was eight years old small, my sister was five years old tiny, my mum was thirty years old frail, my daddy was thirty three years old strong and the Border Collie, Kompa, who my mother had given me for my sixth birthday, was a year and three months old feisty”

 

 

Every picture painted of his family succinctly describes the experience of the child-narrator. 

 

 

Mrs Osagie dies from Sickle Cell crisis, her daughter Eghe Boom Boom suffers from the same ailment. Osaik is the privileged one and no carrier of genes that will result in similar crisis as his mother and sister. Through his impressive world view, he shares the sincerity of a child’s challenges, whose shoulders bear too much weight than can be carried, especially the task of giving care to his only siblings (a sister and a dog) and extending same to his father.

 

 

In thirteen chapters, readers are taken on journey of life lessons. It is the unveiling of a family’s experiences, where courage fuses with hope, although the baggage of despair and disappointment gnaw at the hearts of the characters in this work, the joy of a life transformed brings eventual reprieve. Pain is splattered across the phases of the lives of the Osagie family; the battle for the life of Eghe Boom Boom is better imagined than experienced. Through it all, it is the knowledge about Sickle Cell Anaemia and challenges the sufferer/s endured as well the efforts made to prevent losing a daughter to the ailment that had taken her mother.

 

 

The underlying message is to make new lives from informed choices, so as to prevent catalogues of losses, which include loved ones and resources. This beautiful work of fiction carries with it the sustained excitement of a dog-sibling, whose understanding of the super-sensible combines the use of same to aid human interaction as well as bring reprieve. No mistake made, the dog never spoke in human language, however, the capacity of a kid to understand and interpret the dog’s communication makes for proper representation of a world, where kids love to be and feel unbridled in all they want to do.

 

 

The humanity in the work is established at the juncture where help comes for the little child, an achievement aided through a mother who is physically absent but remains a shining light that guides the actions of her living lovelies even from the sky where she abides. It is about sacrifice by the families of a donor for a greater cause, a clarion call for many to do more and a glimmer of hope for those who suffer from same or those who cater to the needs of anyone who is undergoing same.

 

 

Jude Idada informs children through adult intervention, what the ailment is all about, and equally relates with adults, about the need to guide, guard and unreservedly care for the living as well the unborn child.  He allows children be who they are, but does not subtract from the importance of what must be known by all and sundry. It is a work where both kids and adults can conveniently draw from and unarguably, a book for all seasons.

 

 

‘Boom Boom’ is on the final shortlist of three for the Nigeria Prize for Literature 2019, being Idada’s second children’s fiction. It definitely needs no further argument that this current work is worth its weight in Platinum. The judges for the award of this year’s prize will not be expected to miss their chance of a lifetime to announce the right winner for the prize, being the first children’s book ever to carve such an unrivalled niche for itself on such an important national and global health concern.

 

 

Eghe Boom Boom eventually becomes a Star, and as diamond, the Star shines having been smoothened by several challenges. She is a living Star, occupying a portion of the universe, causing two Stars to be astride the cosmic and earth’s sphere. The Star carries a message that must not be despised, a lesson better learned by being guided rather than experientially, a Star that can keep shining because it’s a warrior.

 

 

A Star’s re-birth elicits the words, “Love is beautiful and it should always be celebrated, but the love that enables this disease is a selfish kind of love. The love that is selfish is not worthy of being called love. So if you are in a relationship where you know there is a chance of bringing a child with Sickle Cell Anaemia into this world, please think twice about it…. and may the love that gives life instead of death reign forever”.

 

 

Continue Reading

 

 

 

 

 

ABUJA MAN REVEALS (FREE) SECRET FRUITS THAT INCREASED MANHOOD AND LASTING POWER IN 7DAYS

 

… CLICK HERE TO GET IT!

 

 

 

Categories

Facebook

BUA Adverts

Trending

Take advantage of our impressive online traffic; advertise your brands and products on this site. For Advert Placement and Enquiries, Call: Mobile Phone:+234 805 0498 544. Online Editor: Tunde Sulaiman Mobile Phone: 0805 0498 544; Email: tunsul2@gmail.com. Copyright © 2018 NewTelegraph Newspaper.

%d bloggers like this: