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Affordable Art Auction holds in Lagos

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Arthouse Contemporary’s fourth annual Affordable Art Auction is set to hold on Saturday, February 23, 2019, at the Kia Showroom, Victoria Island, Lagos.

The Affordable Art Auction which aims to engage new collectors with all works of art estimated below one million naira, features artworks that are affordable, as the titled suggests. The auction preview, Art Night Out, will feature art, music and live performances.

This edition of the Affordable Art Auction features 97 lots by leading modern and contemporary artists. This auction will feature works by modern masters including Bruce Onobrakpeya, David Dale, Kolade Oshinowo, Jacob Afolabi, Jimoh Buraimoh, Abiodun Olaku, Alex Shyngle, Twins Seven Seven.

 

Leading contemporary artists include Rom Isichei, Victor Ehikhamenor, Angela Isiuewe, Lemi Ghariokwu, Diseye Tantua, Victor Ekpuk, Dele Jegede, Tola Wewe, Jerry Buhari, Nike Okundaye, Duke Asidere and Ben Osaghae.

The Affordable Art Auction also features rising artists, including Tyna Adebowale, Yadichinma Ukoha-Kalu, Johnson Uwadinma, Olufemi Oyewole, Yasser Claud-Ennin, Deborah Segun, John Madu, Dare Adenuga, Habeeb Andu and Femi Morakinyo, many of whom are participating for the first time at auction.

The auction will also feature charity lots to support the Arthouse Foundation, a non-profit artist residency programme in Lagos, with artworks by Chibuike Uzoma, Nwachukwu Ike, Akande and George Edozie.

The proceeds from these charity lots will go directly to supporting the programmes of the Arthouse Foundation, including its residencies, workshops, talks and exhibitions.

The Affordable Art Auction places a special focus on contemporary photography, featuring image-based work by Leonce Raphael Agbdojelou, Kadara Enyeasi, Logo Oluwamuyiwa, Jenevieve Aken, Dandelion Eghosa, and Oladapo Ogunjobi.

Founded in 2007, Arthouse Contemporary is an international auction house that specialises in modern and contemporary art from West Africa. Arthouse Contemporary aims to create awareness of the scope of contemporary art in the region, encourage international recognition towards its talented artists and strengthen the economy of its art market.

Artworks are available for public viewing at the Kia Showroom, Friday, February 22, 2019, and Saturday, February 23, 2019.

The Affordable Art Auction is generously supported by Kia Motors, Le Connaisseur, Chocolat Royal, 7UP and The Guardian.

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Literature

Jude Idada wins $100,000 NLNG Literature Prize

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Jude Idada wins $100,000 NLNG Literature Prize

The Advisory Board for The Nigeria Prize for Literature, sponsored by Nigeria LNG Limited, has announced “Boom Boom”, written by Jude Idada, as the winner of the $100,000 prize for 2019.

The book edged out Dunni Olatunde’s “Mystery at Ebenezer Lodge” and O.T. Begho’s “The Great Walls of Benin”, which are the other two books in the Shortlist of Three, to clinch the prize out of 173 books submitted for the competition in March this year.

The announcement was made on Saturday at NLNG’s 20-30 Anniversary Ball and Award Night in Abuja by the Chairman of the Advisory Board, Professor Emeritus Ayo Banjo.

The event commemorates NLNG’s 30 years anniversary of incorporation, 20 years of safe and reliable production and delivery of LNG from its six-train plant on Bonny Island and 15 years of sponsoring the Nigeria Prize for Literature.

Dignitaries at the event included the Senate President, Ahmed Lawal; the Amanyanabo of Bonny Kingdom, His Majesty, King Edward Asimini William Dappa Pepple III, Perekule XI; NLNG’s Board of Directors, led by Chief Osobonye R. Long John, the Board’s Chairman; NLNG’s past Managing Directors and Deputy Managing Directors of NLNG; NLNG’s Management Team led by Tony Attah, Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer and Sadeeq Mai-Bornu, Deputy Managing Director; as well as other dignitaries.

Also at the event, Professor Meihong Wang and Dr. Mathew Aneke were also awarded $100,000 as joint-winners of The Nigeria Prize for Science for Year 2019. Wang and Aneke were announced as winners in September 2019 by the prize’s Advisory Board for their work on Carbon Capture, Carbon Utilization, and Biomass Gasification and Energy Storage for Power Generation.

Speaking during his welcome address, NLNG’s Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Tony Attah, said the management and staff of NLNG, inspired by the company’s vision of being a global LNG company, maintained international best practices in operations and safely and reliably delivered LNG cargoes around the world without harm to humans or the environment to earn a prominent place in the global market.

“We are here to celebrate the successes of this unique Nigerian brand which has recorded notable global recognitions, first, as the fastest growing LNG company in the world, in 2008 when we grew from a two-train plant complex in 1999 to a six-train plant just within nine years after start-up. At that time, we were also the fourth major supplier of LNG, contributing 4% of the nation’s GDP, until recently when our contribution was estimated at 1% following the rebasing of the nation’s GDP.

“Only last year, we were ranked first worldwide in plant reliability and we currently hold the fifth place in global market share, a position that we risk losing soon if we do not expand our capacity with the addition of more volumes. We are Africa’s leading supplier of LNG and the single largest industrial complex in the continent, third largest in the world, doing global business with a workforce that is more than 95% indigenous and a wholly Nigerian Senior Management Team,” he stated.

On the prizes, Attah remarked that the company was also celebrating 15 years of successful administration of the Science and Literature prizes, saying: “These past years has been an arduous journey but most definitely very fulfilling for us and I believe for the country as well. I say so unequivocally because thanks to the prizes, our nation now boasts of scientific breakthroughs and famous works on poetry, prose, drama and children’s literature that have earned the prizes a reputation as the most prestigious prizes in sub-Saharan Africa.”

The Deputy Managing Director, Sadeeq Mai-Bornu, in his remarks, expressed appreciation to all the company’s stakeholders for the successes recorded over the years, adding that through partnership with all the levels of government, NLNG has been able to progress towards achieving Train 7, as well as the advancement of Corporate Social Responsibility goals.

While delivering the judges’ report, Professor Banjo said: “Based on standard criteria such as literary merit, appeal of content to the target audience, social relevance of the subject matter explored, and a unique capacity to communicate pain and its relief as a human social and natural experience in a way that children can understand and relate with, Boom Boom, was declared as the winning entry.”

The Nigerian Prize for Literature rotates yearly amongst four literary genres: prose fiction, poetry, drama and children’s literature. 2020’s competition will focus on prose fiction.

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Literature

Preserve dying culture for generations to come

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Preserve dying culture for generations to come

Book title: Tongues of the Forecourt: A Collection of Yoruba Proverbs and Aphorisms

Author: Olawale Obadeyi 

Editor: Leke Akinrowo 

Pages: 129 

Book reviewer: Dr. Tunji Azeez

 

 

T

ongues of the Forecourt is Wale Obadeyi’s offering to a people whose rich cultural values and mores are being fast eroded in the face of Euro-American and Asian dominated world. Based entirely on the cosmological and epistemological fount of the Yoruba people, the book is an ambitious and daunting attempt by a culture activist to draw attention to two of the vehicles of self-preservation, growth and development – proverb and aphorism.

 

 

The book contains 250 carefully selected proverbs and aphorisms that cover diverse aspects of the life and cosmology of the Yoruba people. While this number may seem meager as mentioned by the writer of the foreword, Professor Adeoti, they open vistas into the rich and unique culture and mind of the Yoruba people across time and space.

 

 

The editor, too, is a true friend also added something fundamental to the book; he edited the work for grammatical and typographical mistakes, ensured that all the proverbs are properly tonal marked to prevent ambiguity and also arranged the proverbs and aphorisms into thematic sections. All of these efforts make the collection a good read as readers can turn to sections for appropriate proverbs and aphorisms to suit specific occasions. Therefore, we have five sections or chapters namely; Destiny and Inevitability, Human Relations, Conflict and Dialectics, Morality, Community and Human Relations, Profundity, Nature and Wildlife and Miscellany. Each of the sections contains 50 proverbs and aphorisms. This seems very balanced. However, one noticed that a few of the proverbs appear in more than one section.

 

 

Another major strength of the book is that the author went to great pains to let non-speakers of the Yoruba language benefit maximally from each proverb or aphorism by making additions to some of them in translation. For instance, ‘Eni a ngbe iyawo bo wa ba, kii garun’ is translated as, “the man for whom we’re bringing a bride does not crane his neck forward in excessive anxiety and childish anticipation’. Here we observe that ‘Excessive anxiety and childish anticipation’ are clearly not in the original proverb. This is because the expression or word “garun’ was expected to communicate anxiety clearly to the Yoruba speaker. However, in an age where parents can hardly speak the language, it becomes imperative to explain the essence of ‘garun’ or ‘craning the neck’ to the reader in a language that they will understand. While this is good for ease of understanding by someone who is not familiar with the culture, it clearly takes away from the brevity of the proverb. As the Yoruba will say, ‘soki l’obe oge’ or abo oro laa so fun omoluabi, to ba de inu e, a di odidi or ‘brief is what is said to a well-trained child, the full import will be felt when he digests it’.

 

 

This confirms the fact as stated by a scholar that ‘when two languages meet, they kiss and quarrel’. This is particularly true of proverbs and aphorisms, verbal resources that thrive on sound and pun. This was noted by Professor Adeoti in his foreword. To make up for this, however, the author attempted a sort of poetic translation.

 

 

The author also took the liberty to put several Yoruba oral traditions like ayajo, ogede, ofo, orin, owe, and isure into the broad heading of proverbs and aphorisms. For instance, Ayunlo, ayunbo lowo nyenu’ (back and forth does the hand visit the mouth} is neither proverb nor aphorism in the strict sense of the words; it isan affirmation or ayajo. The same can be said of ‘Adun ni gbehin ewuro, (sweetness is the aftermath of the bitter leaf plant), ‘Abere a lo, ki ona okun to di, (The needle must pass through before the path becomes impassable for the thread}. All these can be classified as ayajo or affirmation. They are used to affirm or bring to reality a desired state of mind.

 

 

Also in another section, we have “Yokolu yokoluko a tan bi, iyawo gboko sanle, oko yoke, (Aha! Aha! Is it not over, the wife floors the husband in a fight and he has developed a hunch back’). Like the previously mentioned ones, this is neither a proverb nor an aphorism. This is merely a Yoruba song of mockery of a husband who was floored in a fight by his wife. It is used to mock the defeat of an expected stronger opponent in a fight who unexpectedly is defeated by the underdog. Also on page 39, Wale documents a popular saying that, ‘Ibere ko lonise, eni to ba se dopin la o gbala’, (Beginning a task is not the true test of a good worker, he who completes his work is the one who is truly saved). This popular saying is a Christianity-influenced translation of the original which is ‘Ibere kolo nise, eni to ba se dopin la o yin’ or (Beginning a task is not a good test of a true worker, he who completes his work it is that is truly praised).

 

 

Like most intellectuals who have attempted to translate Yoruba epistemological modes into English and other languages, he is confronted with the reality that the Yoruba, over the ages have made clear that, ‘Ede elede ko le salaye asa alasa’ or (No foreign tongue can satisfactorily capture another’s culture). It is therefore, interesting that on page 178, we have “Oun to se igunnugun to fi pa lori, oun lo se akalamagbo to fi yogege l’orun’ (The fate which befell the vulture and made him bald, is the same that befell the phoenix that gave him a goiter hanging down his neck). Here, while the effort in translation is commendable, one notices that Akala or ground hornbill is translated as the phoenix, a bird in Greek mythology. The same is repeated on page 84. Also, we have instances where two proverbs are merged into one to achieve emphasis. For example, ‘ Omo eni kii se idi bebere, ka fi ileke si idi omo elomiran, teni nteni,” (that a man’s daughter has a broad behind is not enough reason to go and adorn the backside of another’s daughter with waist beads; what we have is what is ours). This is a combination of two proverbs. The proverb that has been added to the original is (Teni nteni, akisa ni taatan (One’s property is one’s property, a rag naturally belongs to the dumpsite). (page 94)

 

 

Despite some of these observations, we must commend Wale for several brilliant translations and improvement on original proverbs and aphorisms to bring their essence closer to the people. One particular one deserves mention; on page 94, his translation gives a more vivid description of the nature of the cat than the original. The proverb here is ‘Ologbo to sun bi ole, oun to ma je lo nwa’ is translated as (A cat that lies lazily around, merely awaits its next prey). This gives a vivid description of the cat as a predator and not as an animal that waits to be fed as the original proverb suggests.

 

 

In conclusion, Tongues of the Forecourt is a brilliant work of genius and an effort to preserve a dying culture for generations to come. The book couldn’t have come at a better time when parents, even those without Western education are making efforts to ensure that their children don’t speak their mother tongue. The book is a great contribution to the large body of work on Yoruba culture and values. Its simplicity and profundity will endear it to readers of all ages, cultures and class. It is a rare gift from a true public intellectual.

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Literature

Beasts on Rampage, Something to Live For and other stories

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Beasts on Rampage,  Something to Live For and other stories

Book title: Love Like A Woman and Other Stories

Author: Razinat T Mohammed

Pagination: 120

Publisher: Kraft Books Limited

Reviewer: Adeniyi Taiwo Kunnu

 

 

T

he human heart is as deep as complex, and when it comes to matters of the woman heart, the discourse takes a unique turn in need of careful attention. Razinat Mohammed in this work, “Love Like a Woman and other stories”, examines the multifarious fictional realities in the lives of different women, deftly navigating the planes of marriage, religion, culture and the vicissitudes that affect other lives.

 

 

Eleven stories in 120 gripping pages; and the reader could never be left the same way because the pieces contained in one piece gets one acquainted with the not-too-often examined daily or lifetime experiences of people. If only we knew the much we should, as someone once said, we would have done more to make the world better than we have it now. From the first story, Razinat simply conveys delicious incidences and at times unsavoury glitches in ‘fine’ vocabulary.

 

 

“Something to Live For” gives needed premonition which later comes to fore in the other stories. Afi, hungry and tired descended into another realm which reveals her experiences as a woman married off against her will. Failing in her bid to commit suicide and having been rescued by a stranger, her life continues for a brief moment in lonely forest. Razinat employs the stream of consciousness technique, demonstrating how often times we keep our fears at the subconscious, but present to the world the side which fits men’s acceptance.

 

 

Importantly, Afi chooses the real world where her torrid relationship with her spouse could not prevent her from getting back to the one person in her family where her only love still remains. She could leave every other thing and move on with her life, but in this instance; the propelling force of love keeps her in. Her memories of Efida can wait, while the painful face-off with Uduma must be shrugged off.

 

 

Sterile Water takes the reader on another fictional journey in realistic representation. Kulu’s life depicts one whose existence is enmeshed in destructive poverty. In a family of five children, jobless husband and offensive cultural practice which are obviously unfavourable to the plight of the mother who toils but gets incommensurate returns. This is a creative output which addresses, not only an area of general concern, but specific cultural distastes.

 

 

The third story, which also doubles as the title of the collection is “Love Like A Woman’s”, takes this narrative a notch higher.  Dije bears the burden of love by giving her life to a man whose mental state defies immediate or remote remedy. The story describes the height of one’s love characterised by ‘ultimate sacrifice’, and in this wise it is a woman giving her life, having first lost the life of the unborn to the violence of a mentally unstable man.

 

 

In “Laila”, Razinat gives new perspective to the weighty concerns of an erstwhile divorcee.  Overwhelmed by the stigma associated with being unmarried on the one side and the fear of being out of a second marriage of three months on the other, Laila contends with the disrespectful gateman in her new home, the pressured facilities, step-children rivalry, perceptions by the older wife and ultimately her sexual preferences.

 

 

The author keeps readers’ taste buds watered with “The U-Turn”. Here, a woman also finds herself on the receiving end of the pugilist. A husband-to-be; a beautiful prospect in a daughter in-law; a dotting mother-in-law and the Achilles Heels of being overweight all come together causing flurry of emotions. So, when England came to Nigeria in the hope of a damsel, Sam got a shocker in eve’s daughter who has indulged beyond measure in ‘fatteners’. In summary, Mary Rose does not have the Knight in any shining armour as hers. He, back to England, while the consolatory words of her mother in-law does nothing to change Sam’s mind.

 

 

“Beasts on Rampage” is another delicious read which queries the sanity of allowing the wild dwell amongst the urbane. There are circuses where wild animals are on display for fun, but having these carnivorous mammals in neighbourhoods gets a thumb down here. Mohammed weaves her words around the humanity in people, touching on the unjust treatment of the average in society and arrives its zenith with the distaste that under-lie her fictive presentation. She sure makes the reader wonder but in a maze of reading experiences.

 

 

One Good Turn is one of morality…, of a home gone apart…. of a child turned out and left on the streets…, of a father bereft of needful values and love and subsequent degeneration but eventual redemption of a dear life. This story x-rays parents and parenting, while also exploring peer influences and workings around it.

 

 

“Official Touts” rounds off this collection, and this story picks holes in the often mentioned fake police experiences. This piece regales readers with the stop and search on the roads by police and the check point experiences. A travelling family that parts with cash and kind; and then in turn receives some ‘change’ from the money stolen from them gets the reader’s needful attention. This is an eye opener to stepping up the game in terms of security so as to keep men of the underworld on their toes.

 

 

A Love Like A Woman and Other Stories is truly a fascinating collection. It is a work recommended for its unique perspectives and indeed a deserving applause as a beautiful piece of literature.

 

 

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Literature

Nigerian poet, Ipadeola, bags International Writing Programme in US

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Nigerian poet, Ipadeola, bags International Writing Programme in US

Award-winning poet and author of short stories, Tade Ipadeola, has been selected alongside 28 other accomplished writers from across the globe to participate in the International Writing Programme (IWP) Fall Residency at the University of Iowa, courtesy of the United States Department of State.

Ipadeola, who was the 2013 winner of the Nigeria Prize for Literature, left on September 1 to participate at the world’s oldest and largest multinational writing residency. The programme ends on to November 16.

Before Ipadeola’s selection, 34 Nigerian literary figures had participated in the IWP Fall Residency. Notable among them are Elechi Amadi (1973), Cyprian Ekwensi (1974), Ola Rotimi (1980), Femi Osofisan (1986), Niyi Osundare (1988), Festus Iyayi (1990), Lola Shoneyin (1999), Obari Gomba (2016).

Over the course of 11 weeks, Ipadeola and the other participants will give readings and lectures that share their work and cultures, collaborate with artists from other genres and art forms, and travel to interact with audiences and literary communities across the United States.

In addition, the residency will provide the writers a one-of-a-kind inter-cultural opportunity to forge productive relationships with colleagues and translators, and take part in the vibrant social and academic life of the University of Iowa as well as the larger American literary scene.

United States Consulate Public Affairs Officer, Russell Brooks congratulated the Nigerian writer on his acceptance into the residency program.

According to him, the goal of the IWP Fall Residency is to provide outstanding writers with a platform for cultural exchange and collaboration.

Ipadeola, an essayist and translator, has three published works, including The Sahara Testament, a poetry collection, which won the Nigeria Prize for Literature in 2013 and has been translated into Dutch, French, Spanish and Xhosa.

In 2009, he won the Delphic Laurel in Poetry for his Yoruba poem Songbird at the Delphic Games in Jeju, South Korea. In 2012, he translated Paid on Both Sides, the first dramatic work of renowned Anglo-American poet, W.H. Auden, into Yoruba as Lamilami.

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Literature

Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

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Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

The Nigeria Prize for Literature has announced shortlist of three for the 2019 edition of the Prize.

They are Boom, Boom by Jude Idada, Mystery at Ebenezer’s Lodge by Dunni Olatunde, and The Great Walls of Benin, O. T. Begho.

The shortlist, which was drawn from initial shortlist of 11 books, was announced today in Lagos by the Chairman of the Advisory Board for the prize, Emeritus Prof. Ayo Banjo.

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Literature

Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

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Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

The Nigeria Prize for Literature has announced shortlist of three for the 2019 edition of the Prize.

They are Boom, Boom by Jude Idada, Mystery at Ebenezer’s Lodge by Dunni Olatunde, and The Great Walls of Benin, O. T. Begho.

The shortlist, which was drawn from initial shortlist of 11 books, was announced today in Lagos by the Chairman of the Advisory Board for the prize, Emeritus Prof. Ayo Banjo.

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Literature

Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

Published

on

Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

The Nigeria Prize for Literature has announced shortlist of three for the 2019 edition of the Prize.

They are Boom, Boom by Jude Idada, Mystery at Ebenezer’s Lodge by Dunni Olatunde, and The Great Walls of Benin, O. T. Begho.

The shortlist, which was drawn from initial shortlist of 11 books, was announced today in Lagos by the Chairman of the Advisory Board for the prize, Emeritus Prof. Ayo Banjo.

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Literature

Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

Published

on

Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

The Nigeria Prize for Literature has announced shortlist of three for the 2019 edition of the Prize.

They are Boom, Boom by Jude Idada, Mystery at Ebenezer’s Lodge by Dunni Olatunde, and The Great Walls of Benin, O. T. Begho.

The shortlist, which was drawn from initial shortlist of 11 books, was announced today in Lagos by the Chairman of the Advisory Board for the prize, Emeritus Prof. Ayo Banjo.

Continue Reading

Literature

Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

Published

on

Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

The Nigeria Prize for Literature has announced shortlist of three for the 2019 edition of the Prize.

They are Boom, Boom by Jude Idada, Mystery at Ebenezer’s Lodge by Dunni Olatunde, and The Great Walls of Benin, O. T. Begho.

The shortlist, which was drawn from initial shortlist of 11 books, was announced today in Lagos by the Chairman of the Advisory Board for the prize, Emeritus Prof. Ayo Banjo.

Continue Reading

Literature

Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

Published

on

Nigeria Prize for Literature announces shortlist

The Nigeria Prize for Literature has announced shortlist of three for the 2019 edition of the Prize.

They are Boom, Boom by Jude Idada, Mystery at Ebenezer’s Lodge by Dunni Olatunde, and The Great Walls of Benin, O. T. Begho.

The shortlist, which was drawn from initial shortlist of 11 books, was announced today in Lagos by the Chairman of the Advisory Board for the prize, Emeritus Prof. Ayo Banjo.

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