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Missing baby’s corpse, placenta: Dead foetus, placenta can return to mother’s womb –Traditionalists

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Missing baby’s corpse, placenta: Dead foetus, placenta can return to mother’s womb –Traditionalists

The controversy over the missing baby at the Specialist Hospital, Akure, the Ondo State capital, has deepened as traditionalists disagreed among themselves over the possibilities of a clinically removed foetus to return to mother’s womb. BABATOPE OKEOWO who spoke with various Ifa priests and traditionalist reports

 

The death of Mrs. Nike Owonidahun, the wife of a Police Corporal attached to the Police Band Section of the Ondo State Police Command, has stoked crisis as the baby and placenta were missing when the family of Femi Owonidahun came to bury their dead.
Nike had died while delivering her baby at the Police Clinic in Akure and her corpse was taken to the State Specialist Hospital because the Police Clinic did not have mortuary.

However, both the baby and the placenta were missing when the family came to take their remains for the burial, leading to a protest at the premises of the hospital.

However, there was another round of controversy when there was a report that the missing baby had returned to the womb of the mother in a mysterious way, the assertion the medical practitioners disputed.

But traditionalists and native doctors differed sharply over the possibility of the removed foetus and placenta returning to the womb of the mother.

While some traditionalists were of the view that a removed foetus from the mother’s uterus can return if those handling it have knowledge about it, others said it is impossible for such a ‘miracle’ to happen.

Already, medical practitioners have ruled out the possibilities of it happening. They were unanimous that a removed foetus cannot return to the mother’s womb.

The State Commissioner for Health, Dr. Wahab Adegbenro, who spoke the minds of medical practitioners, insisted that it was not possible medically for an operated baby to return to the womb of the woman.

Dr. Adegbenro said, “It isn’t medically possible for a foetus that has been removed to return to the uterus without anybody bringing it back. It is not possible for the foetus to come back to the uterus on its own.
“The police are investigating. They will tell us the outcome of their investigation. Maybe they will subject the woman to autopsy. These are issues that will come up along the line.”

The medical doctor found support in the head of Traditionalists and Ifa Priests in Oba-Ile in Akure North Local Government, Chief Oluwagbamigbe Fagoroyo, who said: “It is not possible for the foetus to return to the mother’s womb.”
Fagoroyo said it is possible that the missing baby and the foetus might have been sold to some ritualists for money making charms.
His words: “I don’t use human parts for rituals. I have heard that they use human parts for money making rituals, but I don’t know how they do it. Some people also use if for rituals if they are contesting for high positions or looking for a special favour.

“I don’t know if some of my members patronize mortuaries or cemeteries to harvest body parts. I have not seen them do it before, but I have heard about it severally. The Ifa priests must caution one another. It is not good to use human parts for rituals. It has repercussions in the future. It may have repercussion on their wives or children.

“We native doctors should not use human parts for anything because of the future of our children. It may even affect the traditionalist who is trying to help other people to prosper.”
But another Ifa Priest and the head of the herbalists in the Deji of Akure’s Palace, Chief Fakehinde Mayegun, said the foetus can return to the mother’s womb if the traditionalist has the knowledge.

Mayegun said: “It is neither here nor there. It is possible because nothing is difficult before God. The child may be a powerful person. The powerful child on his or her own will return to the womb.

“The elders who are knowledgeable about the world may return the child into the womb of the mother to help unravel the mysteries or something shrouded in secrecy.
“It is also possible if the owners of this world with terrestrial powers intervene, they will return the child into the womb.

“It is also possible for a dead person to appear in other places. All the creatures in the world are twins. If a man dies, it is only in the resurrection that you will see the person. There is nobody that is coming to this world for the first time. If a child is born, the placenta is also a living being. If a man dies, his spirit goes into another place.

“I have heard stories about stolen corpses in the mortuary. I have heard stories about people breaking into the cemetery to steal body parts. But I don’t know what type of rituals they use human part for. I only consult the oracle for the town and the people who are close to me.”
Another traditionalist, Prince Adesola Adedeji Adesida, who is the Obadua of Akure Kingdom, said the mortuary attendant may have stolen the child as a dead child cannot develop legs to walk away from the mortuary where he was kept.

Adesida said: “It is possible that the child may have been stolen. But if he is a powerful child, he will return to the womb of the mother. I don’t know which one happened in this instance.

“But ordinarily, it is not possible for a child that has left the womb of the mother to return. But nowadays, people seek spiritual powers through many means. It is only God that can unravel the mysteries about the missing child.”

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