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BBNaija (S4): Khafi wins N7.6m car

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BBNaija (S4): Khafi wins N7.6m car

ENTERT (pix: Khafi attached)

Housemate, Khafi Kareem has won a 7.6 million Naira IVM Fox car in the ongoing BBNaija season four.

 

News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that the Khafi won the car prize during the ‘Proudly Nigerian’ challenge on Saturday.

 

The challenge, sponsored by Nigerian brand, Innosson Motors, tasked housemates to present their Nigerian stories and highlight the beauty of being Nigerian.

 

During the first round, housemates gave presentations on their Nigerian story, however, Khafi’s excellent and inspiring presentation got viewers emotional.

 

At the end of the first round, housemates were asked to pull ribbons attached to the Innosson car. Those who dropped the ribbons were disqualified.

 

After some housemates were distracted by pizza and noise, Khafi, Mercy, Cindy and Jackye were the last ones standing.

 

 

The other women eventually dropped their ribbon, leaving Khafi to win the coveted prize.

 

Reacting to her win, Khafi said she loved the red colour and the car would be her first.

 

Fans have taken to social media to congratulate her and pass remarks about her moving speech.

 

@Juliet_ said, “Congrats Khafi, a win well deserved. Proudly Nigerian indeed.”

 

@Miracle tweeted, “She was the first that entered into that car and blow the horn of the car, she had one of the best speech, she is the deserving winner, kudus baby girl, I am happy u won.”

 

@Tessyme said, “She waz Determined from start.. And thanked God for her first car even before wining it. Am happy for her.”

 

@Chanty4 said, “Salute to the Nigerian spirit. Salute to Khafi. Congratulations to the last four. #BBNaijia #BBNaijaPepperDem.”

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Report: Robert Downey Jr. to return to the MCU in ‘Black Widow’

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Report: Robert Downey Jr. to return to the MCU in ‘Black Widow’

Robert Downey Jr. loves Marvel 3000, and the feeling is apparently mutual.

The fast-talking, kebab-eating and gauntlet-snapping Tony Stark/Iron Man will reportedly live to see another day in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, with a few caveats, of course.

The iron-clad superhero, who has appeared in 10 films in the ever-expanding franchise, is apparently set to stage a comeback in the forthcoming “Black Widow” prequel starring Scarlett Johansson.

In a Deadline report about this year’s Saturn Award winners, writer Geoff Boucher dropped a bombshell about the actor reprising his role in the long-awaited solo film following super-spy Natasha Romanoff.

“Robert Downey Jr. will be seen in the role of Stark one more time, however, in the Marvel prequel ‘Black Widow’ in May 2020,” Boucher wrote.

Representatives for Marvel did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment.

Given how Tony Stark met his end in this summer’s record-breaking “Avengers: Endgame,” fans had already said their goodbyes to the character. But Marvel is currently juggling multiple timelines, as “Black Widow” will take place after the events of past Marvel installment “Captain America: Civil War,” which means that Iron Man is still very much alive when the film begins.

Johansson’s character was also killed off in “Endgame,” which wrapped up more than a decade of storytelling for the movie studio, so her solo film could be the only opportunity for the two actors, who first shared the screen in “Iron Man 2,” to appear together one last time.

Downey Jr. is the linchpin of the MCU and could provide a much-needed bridge to the upcoming Phase 4 of film and TV projects as creators break new ground.

Directed by Cate Shortland, “Black Widow” will also star Florence Pugh, Rachel Weisz, O-T Fagbenle and “Stranger Things” actor David Harbour.

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Why Ebuka is the perfect host for Big Brother Naija

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Why Ebuka is the perfect host for Big Brother Naija

The first time you met Ebuka Obi-Uchendu, he was like Jon Snow. You could say he knew nothing about show business. But did that stop him from being relaxed and having the time of his life on TV in front of the entire African continent? Heck, no.

This was in 2006. And Ebuka’s Westeros was the Big Brother Nigeria house. Ebuka was charismatic, brimming with fun energy, and, of course, charming. Many viewers easily assumed the prize money was for him to lose.

But that was before Biggie threw a spanner in the works. Big Brother unleashed Katung Aduwak on the housemates 21 days into the competition and everything went to hell—well, that’s a story for another day.

Back to Ebuka. He was great, and his personality stood out. And spoiler alert: Ebuka didn’t win that edition of BBNaija.

That was 13 years ago and, as you know, the dude is still here, more famous than the winner of that contest and Ebuka has been hosting BBNaija itself for three seasons now.

If you think about it, you’re likely to conclude that Ebuka and Big Brother Naija are a match made in TV heaven. And I’ll absolutely agree with you. The thing, though, is that I’ve figured out the secret to Ebuka’s success with BBNaija.

Let’s break it down:

1. He embodies the original idea of BBN

Big Brother Nigeria has consistently rewarded authenticity. The trick is always how the players parlay that authenticity into riveting TV. Ebuka, even though he didn’t win the game, was judged to be authentic. Plus, nothing justifies the existence of BBN than ex-housemates, even those who didn’t win, becoming stars on the back of the reality show.

2. He has the looks TV needs

Ebuka once told The Punch newspaper that his first choice of work was as a radio presenter. That would have been a waste of face, wouldn’t it? Thanks to Big Brother, though, he found his mojo on TV and that first appearance has birthed more TV gigs. From Friend or Foe on and the Glo Show on NTA to The Spot and Men’s Corner on Ebony Life as well as Rubbin’ Minds on Channels, he’s been a permanent fixture on the small screen.

3. Ebuka takes chances

Now, we must talk about that time Ebuka broke the internet with one picture of him in that agbada. The funny thing was, before him, others had tried on that style of agbada he wore to Banky W’s wedding but on those people, the concept just didn’t take.

4. He plays the crowd the way a virtuoso would

If you go on Google right now, there’s Ebuka with answers to frequently googled questions about him. In one he says, “I speak English fluently, Igbo fluently, pidgin English, and sarcasm.” Ebuka has been a popular Big Brother Naija presenter, not because of what he says per se, but how he says what he says.

5. He’s a dream Nigerian youth

Ebuka, 37, is quite well educated. He studied that course your parents wanted you to study aside medicine: LAW. A graduate of the University of Abuja and the Nigerian Law School, he also holds a master’s degree from the American University Washington College of Law. He’s successful. He’s scandal-free and, obviously, he gets paid to do what he loves to do. Anyone who gets a chance to live in the House would want the exact same thing, so it makes sense that they also get the chance to have Ebuka to look up to.

Now, let’s pass the question to you: what other assets do you think make this gentleman perfect for Big Brother Naija?

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How architecture, environment influence identities

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How architecture, environment influence identities

‘If Walls Could Speak’:

 

A

solo exhibition by one of Nigeria’s most promising emerging artists, Patrick Akpojotor, explores subconscious connections between identity and the environment.

 

 

Titled If Walls Could Speak, the exhibition, which opened to the public on Monday September 16, at The Wheatbaker, Ikoyi, Lagos, is curated by SMO Contemporary Art. Works on display include 38 oil paintings, pencil sketches, seminal works in wood, and an installation of copper sculptures, which represent the artists’ exploration of our subconscious connections between identity and the built environment.

 

 

In light of the sustainable development goals SDGs’ recognition of the important role cities and human settlements play in addressing global challenges of ‘inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable’ spaces for human development Akpojotor explores how architecture and our environment influence our individual and collective identities. Growing up in the megacity of Lagos, Akpojotor was fascinated by the names of streets and buildings, and started playing with the personification of abandoned buildings which harbor silent memories of forgotten people and historic events.

 

 

After graduating from the Auchi Polythenic in Fine Art in 2008, followed by a degree in graphic design from Lagos Polytechnic in 2013, Akpojotor worked for Prof. Bruce Onobrakpeya as a studio assistant.  In 2016, Akpojotor was deeply disturbed by the violent ejection of residents of the waterfront slum community of OtodoGbamein Lekki, where thousands of people were displaced. He channeled his anger and frustration into his paintings and wood sculptures, creating buildings with human features and emotions.

 

 

“These signature anthropomorphic structures with their cubist geometry, perspective, balance, and form,” were his creative response to the realities of mega-city population pressure. His imagined structures and abstract compositions interrogate our sense of rootedness and belonging. Later that year, Akpojotor won the first Art X Lagos Prize for emerging artists with this important body of work.

 

 

“Akpojotor’s works stimulate us to a refreshing experience of the artist’s intuition, childhood, the search of identity, adventure and romance with space,” notes notable art critic and Professor of Fine Arts at Ahmadu Bello University (ABU), Prof. Jerry Buhari. “Watching Patrick grow as an artist over a span of fifteen years I have a sense of fulfillment as a mentor,” added Master Artist Prof. Bruce Onobrakpeya, a pioneer of Nigeria’s contemporary art scene. “He is very talented, intelligent, diligent and passionate, and is able to draw inspiration from things around him and from faraway places.”

 

 

“These amazing works not only give us an emotional feel of the rich and colorful history of Lagos’ built environment; they also pay homage and immortalize important people, like Dr. Stella Adadevoh, whose timely medical intervention saved Lagos from the spread of the dreaded ebola disease in 2014,” said Sandra Mbanefo Obiago, the curator of the exhibition

 

.

“Akpojotor’s work captures the heart of traditional, colonial, and contemporary architecture scattered across the Lagos cityscape” concluded Architect Mosun Ogunbanjo, Director of the Wheatbaker. “We are proud to host If Walls Could Speak and use our hotel to promote the best of Nigeria’s creative talent to a growing local and international community of art enthusiasts.”

 

 

‘If Walls Could Speak’ is supported by Louis Guntrum Wines, and it will be open till November 8, 2019.

 

 

Patrick is a multidisciplinary artist working across painting, drawing, printmaking, installation art and sculpture. His work is influenced by his fascination with the built space and architecture and their ability to shape ones identity. He is interested in the differences in human attitude, relating to the culture of the built environment that they inhabit. His work merges together visual elements of the built environment, geometry, human forms and imagined spaces to create abstract composition that interrogates our sense of perception which challenges us to see differently.

 

 

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Funding, relevance of private universities

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Funding, relevance of private universities

Title: Private University Education in Nigeria: Case Studies in Relevance 

Author: Peter A. Okebukola

 

Publishers: Okebukola Science

 

        Foundation/Sterling Publishers.

 

Pages:       161

 

Published: 2017

 

Reviewer: Chido B. Nwakanma

 

 

 

P

rivate universities are the future of higher education in Nigeria. Twenty years after the first three private universities took off, universities in the private sector model now number more than those of the federal or state governments. Their number will grow even more.

 

 

At the time of writing in October 2017, this book documents 59 private universities in Nigeria. The federal government accounted for 40, while state governments had 44 universities. These are the assertions of the author of this book, an expert on the subject.

 

 

Why are universities run by private sector players doing well? What do they contribute and what justifies their existence and continued growth? How can society assist such a positive development?

 

 

‘Private University Education in Nigeria: Case Studies in Relevance’ is an advocacy book that justifies the presence and growth of private universities in Nigeria and the need to extend to them the financial assistance of the Education Trust Fund that public universities alone currently enjoy. The lead advocate has solid credentials for the case.

 

 

As a former Executive Secretary of the National Universities Commission, Prof Peter Okebukola brings to bear in-depth knowledge and experience of the Nigerian university system. As a regulator of the system, he understands both the requirements and the challenges. He has also served on the Council or Boards of no fewer than four private universities. He thus makes an informed case.

 

 

‘Private University Education in Nigeria’  proclaims that those institutions provide access to candidates who would have been shut out, reintroduced quality in higher education and offer efficient student-focused service delivery. They also infused healthy competition into the system and are focused on delivering quality research outputs. Private universities, he adds, operate a delivery system wrapped around small class sizes and well-resourced classrooms that stimulate the production of good quality graduates and run a predictable academic calendar.

 

 

It lists seven positive attributes. They are contributors to high-level human resource development, train persons with better values and represent a model of university governance in observance of due process, accountability and discipline. They also mostly have a Board of Trustees as an additional layer for accountability. The institutions model financial autonomy as they sink or swim from the income from ventures and other sources that supplement tuition. Discipline is the language in private universities for both staff and students while they are adventurous in exploring new courses that go beyond the NUC’s Benchmark Minimum Academic Standards (BMAS).

 

 

 

Nigeria had an initial false start with private universities when promoters established 24 private institutions between 1980 and 1983. Criteria were unclear. The Federal Government cancelled the process in 1984. The nation then commenced a new operation with Decree 9 of 1993 that allowed individuals, organisations, corporate bodies and local governments to establish and run private universities once they meet the guidelines. The book outlines the 14-step process that the National Universities Commission applies for the licensing of private universities.

 

 

The first set of universities licensed and opened in 1999 are Igbinedion University, Okada, Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo and Madonna University, Okija.

 

 

Despite their positives, subscription of candidates to private universities has been very low, the book discloses. Babcock University in 2017 UTME received 2645 applications, Covenant University 2633 and Afe Babalola University 1240. All others had less than 1000 applications each.

 

 

This book covers its subject matter in eight chapters, a dedication, foreword, preface and a list of the 16 vice-chancellors who responded for their institutions.

 

 

The relevance of private universities is the central thesis of ‘Private University Education in Nigeria’.  The book explores this relevance in nine areas. These are national and global economy, agriculture and food security, education, and manufacturing. Others are power, youth employment, peace-building, religious harmony and conflict resolution as well as research, innovation and development of new products.

 

 

Sixteen universities reported on their contributions as the basis for the case studies. A revised edition of the book should have actual case studies and not the brief notes that some of the institutions passed on. When you hear case studies, you expect diligent reporting “involving an up-close, in-depth, and detailed examination of a subject of study, as well as its related contextual conditions”.

 

Private University Education in Nigeria offers perspective with a look at the trajectory of private universities in the USA, Britain and Europe. It features Harvard University, MIT, Stanford and Yale. There is the University of Buckingham, Ukrainian Free University, and the Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Milan. It reports that Japan has 597 private universities that constitute 78% of its universities. Indonesia has 1200 or 60% while the number for China has exploded from 20 in 1997 to 630 in 2017. Before 1995, only Ghana, Zimbabwe and Kenya had privately-owned universities in Anglophone Africa.

 

 

The book could do with better editing and attention to detail in this area.

 

 

The case for TETFUND support is persuasive. Okebukola argues that since the private sector is the goose that lays the golden egg of TETFUND, private universities should also benefit from the Tertiary Education Trust Fund.

 

 

The author then suggests modalities for the inclusion of the private sector. Private University Education in Nigeria: Case Studies in Relevance delivers on its assigned task of making a case for the existence and contributions of higher institutions promoted by the private sector. The reader would find abundant material in the history of higher education in Nigeria, the growth of private funding and the projection that private universities would eventually dominate.

 

 

Nwakanma is of the School of Media and Communication, Pan Atlantic University, Lagos State

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21st Lagos Book & Art Festival to focus on freedom

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“E

MERGE… Breaking into the NEW”, is the theme for the 2019 edition of the yearly cultural picnic, the Lagos Book & Art Festival, LABAF, scheduled to take place from 4 – 10 November, at the official home of the festival, Freedom Park, Lagos Island and other venues around the city.

 

 

Organised by the Committee for Relevant Art, CORA, this year’s edition, the 21st in the series, is dedicated to the memory of the master artist, Dr. David Herbert Dale, who passed on in the morning of Tuesday, August 6, 2019 following a protracted illness.

 

 

CORA Directorate in a statement said the choice of this year’s festival theme which is ‘EMERGE… Breaking into the NEW’, is a sequel to the themes of the past two editions of the festival: ERUPTIONS: Global Fractures and the Our Common humanity (2017) and RENEWAL: Towards a World that Works for All (2018).

 

 

“EMERGE… is premised on the notion of breaking free from the shackles of social, political, economic and cultural factors that inhibit the progress of the individual and the nation. Ostensibly, the theme will reflect on obstacles to the process of nation building, and human capital development – two concepts central to the philosophy of the Committee for Relevant Art, CORA, and, which have consistently formed the core of the objective of LABAF since its birth in 1999 to mark the return of Nigeria to democratic governance after over three decades of military regimes. The thematic thrust of the 31-odd events that will feature in the week-long festival will thus examine issues around 20 years of Nigeria’s democracy; the shifting political events and discourses around the continent; as well as development in/around global politics.”

 

 

A major feature of the festival is the “Arthouse Honourees”, a yearly conferment of Honours on select members of the culture producing community. According to CORA, the idea of the yearly conferment of Honours on select members of the culture producing community is to formally acknowledge the immense contributions of each of the honourees to the development of the creative sector; essentially to spotlight them as role models to the robust tribe of younger artists, many of who indeed owe their career and successes to the generous selfless giving(s) of the honourees’ intellectual, moral and material resources. The honour is, however, conferred on such individuals as they each attain a milestone in their lives, starting from those clocking 60s and above.

 

 

The honourees for this year are: Nobel Laureate, Prof. Wole Soyinka at 85, veteran musician and culture activist, Tunji Oyelana at 80. Others are those in the 60s Club, they include architect, culture activist, Theo Lawson; theatre director, scholar, Prof. Segun Ojewuyi; theatre artiste and filmmaker, Mahmood Ali-Balogun; theatre artiste and arts manager, Moji Bamtefa; arts administrator and activist, Tope Babayemi; veteran actor and acting teacher, Norbert Young; notable painter, and fine arts teacher, Prof. Jerry Buhari; arts administrator, George Ufot; actor and art activist, Edmond Enaibe; visual artist and teacher, Kunle Adeyemi.

 

 

 

The 2019 LABAF dedicated to the memory of the renowned printmaker, Dr. David Herbert Dale, who passed on in the morning of Tuesday, August 6, 2019 following a protracted illness, will also remember and celebrate the life and times of notable members of the artistic and culture community, who passed on in the course of the year. These include: Bisi Silva (art curator); Okwui Enwezor (art curator and historian); Paul Emema (Scriptwriter, Film Producer); Pius Adesanmi (culture activist and scholar); Eddie Ugbomah (filmmaker and art activist); Molara Ogundipe (Literature teacher and culture scholar); Stella Oyedepo (playwright, arts administrator); Jide Ogungbade (theatre director and broadcaster); Frank Okonta (filmmaker and art patron); Idowu Nubi (film editor).

 

 

Described as ‘Africa’s biggest cultural picnic,’ LABAF is a week-long comprehensive open-air carnivalesque ‘feast of Life and Ideas’ featuring a mix-grill of artistic and cultural events  including: exhibitions of books and arts,  live reading sessions; conversations around books; seminars on visual, performing and allied arts; displays of paintings, sculptures, mixed media, installations and crafts; children and youths art workshops; live music, poetry, drama and dance presentations among others. Preceding the last three (weekend) days of the weeklong event is a four-day Pre-Festival series of events which include a Publishers’ Forum, Writers’ workshops and Book Treks (writers’ visits to schools and engagement with pupils). Overall, it is a carnivalesque atmosphere created to make books look cool.

 

 

The Committee for Relevant Art, CORA, is a group of artistes, art enthusiasts, art promoters and art writers committed to the development of the Arts of Nigeria and their enabling environment. CORA continues to seek out, tend, groom and harvest the best of the old and emerging arts of Nigeria.

 

 

Its mission is to create an enabling environment for the flourishing of the contemporary arts of Nigeria and the continent, while its vision is to Make Art & Culture the Prime Destination for Investment in Nigeria and Africa by 2018.

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“Tales By Moonlight” for 2019 Lights, Camera, AFRICA!!! Film Festival

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T

he Lights, Camera, AFRICA!!! Film Festival returns to its growing Lagos audience for its ninth edition, themed “Tales by Moonlight”.

 

 

The festival will hold 27th – 29th September 2019, at MUSON Centre, Onikan, Lagos.

 

 

Invoking the childhood tableau of the night-time story told to entertain, thrill, delight and teach, this year’s theme harks back to one of the earliest art forms – storytelling.

 

“For so long this medium has been used to teach, to learn, for self-preservation.   

 

“This year’s films are presented as lines drawn in the global narrative, going back and pushing forward – all the time telling a tale. The theme situates the art form in an idyllic format, a common space and an open world in which stories and indeed life lessons are communally shared. These sub-themes speak to the underpinning philosophies at Lights, Camera, AFRICA!!!

 

“This year’s festival demonstrates our intention to host an edition that articulates film as visual and potent storytelling that keeps us connected with the past, and enabled for the future,” Festival Director, Ugoma Adegoke stated.

 

She added that drawing on continuing and supportive friendships and longstanding corporate partnerships, the festival is proud to be able to sustain its commitment to fulfilling its mission of maintaining an open dialogue throughout the world of African film.

 

 

“Numerous films over three days at the Musical Society of Nigeria (MUSON) Onikan covering various genres including documentary, features and shorts are just a segment of the festival experience that is lined up. There will also be special musical presentations and learning platforms for filmmakers and ancillaries of the local film ecosystem, which speak to the 2019 theme,” Adegoke stated.

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Musician, Dammy Krane, arraigned for threatening Merrybet staff members

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Musician, Dammy Krane, arraigned for threatening Merrybet staff members

A popular Nigerian singer and composer, Johnson Oyindamola, popularly known as ‘Dammy Krane’, was on Monday arraigned before an Igbosere Magistrate Court, Lagos for allegedly threatening staff members of a betting company, Merrybet Gold Limited.
The 27-year-old singer was arraigned on a three count charge of conspiracy, threat to life, defamation and conduct likely to cause a breach of peace, preferred against him by the police
Dammy Krane was alleged to have threatened the lives of the staff members on July 29 and also posted an audio and video message on Cool FM 96.9
However, the Police Prosecutor, Inspector J .I Enang, told the court that the singer posted, on the internet, an audio and video recording accusing the company of owing him, after threatening them.
The prosecutor said: “Oyindamola and others at large on July 29, 2019, at Cool FM in Lagos, conspired with others at large to commit felony to wit: Conduct likely to cause breach of peace and threat to life.
“Oyindamola and others at large on the same date, time and place, threatened  the life of the staff of Merrybet Gold Limited.”

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Nazi satire ‘Jojo Rabbit’ wins Toronto film festival’s Oscar-bellwether award

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Nazi satire ‘Jojo Rabbit’ wins Toronto film festival’s Oscar-bellwether award

New Zealander Taika Waititi’s “Jojo Rabbit” on Sunday won the audience award given at the end of the Toronto International Film Festival, which has in many past years been a bellwether for Academy Award winners.

“Jojo Rabbit” is a comic satire about a 10-year-old German boy Jojo (Roman Griffin Davis) during the World War Two, who finds out his mother (Scarlett Johansson) is hiding a young Jewish girl (Thomasin McKenzie) in their attic and turns for help to his imaginary friend Adolph Hitler (Waititi).

Last week, Waititi was awarded the Toronto International Film Festival’s new Ebert Director Award, with the festival’s co-head Cameron Bailey hailing his “razor-sharp humor, faultless style and boundless generosity.”

Among the most popular films by the half-Maori, half-Jewish director is “Thor: Ragnarok,” a 2017 superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character Thor. He is also known for “Boy” and “Hunt for the Wilderpeople.”

In the past 20 years, the Grolsch People’s Choice Award winner, selected based on voting by audiences at the Toronto festival, has gone on to win the Oscar for best picture five times — “Green Book” last year, “12 Years a Slave,” “The King’s Speech,” “Slumdog Millionaire” and “American Beauty.”

Two Toronto runner-ups, “Spotlight” and “Argo,” have also won Oscars during that time and Toronto award winners have been nominated for best picture Oscars in all but one of the past 10 years reports Reuters.

The prize offers C$15,000 in cash and a custom award. The runners-up are Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story” and Bong Joon-ho’s “Parasite.” Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia’s “The Platform” won the festival’s Midnight Madness genre film award, and the documentary award went to Feras Fayyad’s “The Cave.”

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Kevin Hart moved to therapy facility 10 days after car crash

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Kevin Hart moved to therapy facility 10 days after car crash

Hollywood actor and comedian, Kevin Hart, has been released from hospital and is said to be in stable condition.

 

His release from the medical facility where he has been under intense watch and has had to undergo surgery came 10 days after a road accident that left him shaken. TMZ reports that he has been moved to a physical therapy facility where he would be undergoing further treatment, with the report further indicating that Kevin Hart is keeping a positive attitude and is “grateful to be alive.” It was revealed that he suffered three spinal fractures in last Sunday’s road accident but doctors had stated that they expected him to make a full recovery.

 

 

Behind the wheel when the accident occurred at Mulholland Highway, Malibu Hills was his friend, Jared Black, who also suffered major back injuries in the crash while Rebecca Broxterman, Hart’s personal trainer, as well as wife, were also in the vehicle.

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Eedris Abdulkareem celebrates Sowore’s wedding anniversary

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Eedris Abdulkareem celebrates Sowore’s wedding anniversary

Activist and Sahara Reporters publisher, Omoyele Sowore, still in the custody following his arrest early last month owing to a nationwide movement termed #RevolutionNow he championed but he marked his 15th wedding anniversary on Thursday.

 

Making it known was rapper, Eedris Abdulkareem, in an Instagram post on Thursday, as he prayed for bliss in Sowore’s marriage to his wife, Opeyemi, in the face of his “sacrifice for Nigeria today”. Remembering the activist’s 15th wedding anniversary, Abdulkareem wrote: “Fifteen years ago, you tied the nuptial knots that still binds you till date in love and oneness!

 

 

“Love so real and so compassionate as yours makes the world go round and of course, it breaks through any manmade barriers like subjugation, gagging, imprisonment and utterly dehumanising intimidation and treachery. “So, as you sacrifice for Nigeria today, may this anniversary sprout out a bountiful, blessed and glorious tomorrow for you! Happy anniversary once again! Many more conjugal bliss ahead as years come and ago!!! Freedom…”

 

Sowore’s wife, Opeyemi, had in an interview on a TV show in the US, Democracy Now!, said the Federal Government pinned its grievance on Sowore on a meeting he had with the leader of the proscribed Indigenous People of Biafra leader (IPOB), Nnamdi Kanu. “They also mentioned he may have taken money from international countries, and he met them in Dubai.

 

He has never been to Dubai before, which was an interesting statement on the Nigerian government’s part. And no money, basically, has been found with him,” she said.

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