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Buhari, Obasanjo, Abdulsalami, Jonathan advocate action against cancer

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Buhari, Obasanjo, Abdulsalami, Jonathan advocate action against cancer
  • Dickson launches Cancer Foundation in memory of late mother

President Muhammadu Buhari, former presidents Olusegun Obasanjo, Goodluck Jonathan and former Head of State, Gen. Abdulsalami Abubakar, have advocated concerted action against the spread of cancer in the country.

The nation’s leaders spoke yesterday at the official launch of the Henry Seriake Dickson Foundation and ground breaking ceremony of the Goldcoast Dickson Cancer Centre at Toru Orua, Sagbama Local Government Area of Bayelsa State.

The former rulers, according to a statement by Fidelis Soriwei, Special Adviser on Media Relations to Bayelsa State governor, commended Governor Seriake Dickson for taking the initiative to fight cancer through emphasis on early detection and treatment.

They pledged to support the foundation.

Represented by minister-designate, Dr. Chris Ngige, President Buhari described the establishment of the centre as a step in the right direction designed to prevent avoidable deaths and promised to support it.

Ngige saluted the efforts of the governor in his resolve to fight the dreaded disease.

He said the centre could be the nucleus of a major health institution to save millions of lives and urged Governor Dickson not to be deterred from his vision.

His words: “The president congratulates you on the step you have taken to set up the Henry Seriake Dickson Foundation to operate the Goldcoast Dickson Cancer Centre and he describes it as a step in the right direction.

“The president also says the Federal Government is doing a lot in the effort to prevent cancer and wishes to inform you that the Federal Government will readily collaborate with centres like yours.

“On a personal note, as a medical doctor, I want to thank you because it gives me joy when I see a non-medical person doing what you are doing now. This centre could be the nucleus of what Nigeria will use to save many lives.”

Chairman of the occasion, Gen. Abubakar, described the effort as a wonderful philanthropic gesture that is worthy of support and appealed to all to donate generously to the cause.

He stressed that Nigeria was in an urgent need for a well-coordinated action against the disease that is ravaging communities in the country.

Also, Obasanjo praised Dickson for honouring his mother with the setting up of the cancer centre, which, he noted, would go a long way in checking the killer disease.

Obasanjo stated that only those who had come into close contacts with victims of cancer and the traumatic experience would know the magnitude of the pain, anguish and misery being inflicted on the society.

The former president said he was pleased with the other issues the Foundation seeks to address such as record keeping and preservation of the environment.

“When you see what cancer does, particularly the excruciating pain the sufferer goes through, you would want to do everything and anything to comfort those who are victims and, that is exactly what you are doing.

“Cancer can be managed when if it is diagnosed early. The second thing you say your foundation will be doing is what I call institutional memory – one of the things we are very bad at in our country.”

On his part, Jonathan, who pledged to support the foundation, agreed that cancer had become a big problem in the society, stressing the need for collaborative efforts in curbing the disease.

He recalled painfully how the dreaded disease killed his Special Adviser on Strategy and Documentation, and renowned environmentalist, Oronto Douglas.

He said that despite the availability of resources and the desire to fight the disease, he painfully watched his aide die because the disease was diagnosed at an advanced stage.

National Chairman of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), Prince Uche Secondus, pointed out that when the centre is completed, it would help in reducing capital flight on medical tourism.

According to Prince Secondus, leaders across the country should emulate Dickson by investing in critical areas in the health sector.

In his remarks, Dickson expressed gratitude to President Buhari and other leaders for joining him in honouring the first anniversary of the passage of his mother.

While sharing fond memories of his mother, the governor said the foundation would, among other things, carry out research work aimed at early diagnosis and treatment.

Dickson, who noted that the foundation is part of his efforts to continually contribute to the wellbeing of humanity, urged all to donate time, skills and funds to ensure the success of the project.

“It’s an humble effort on my part to set up this cancer foundation because I thought I should have a vehicle through which I could do some public good for humanity.

“I therefore humbly call on public-spirited individuals and those who have resources to support this worthy cause to stop cancer from ravaging our population.”

Highlight of the occasion was the ground-breaking of the Goldcoast Dickson Cancer Centre by Dr. Goodluck Jonathan and commissioning of the Henry Seriake Dickson Foundation Office and Library by Chief Olusegun Obasanjo.

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ISIS claim responsibility for Kabul wedding suicide bombing

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ISIS claim responsibility for Kabul wedding suicide bombing

ISIS has claimed responsibility for a suicide attack at a wedding party in Kabul.

The bomb blast killed at least 63 people and injured another 182 in the Afghan capital on Saturday night.

The venue was packed with party-goers and children when the terrifying attack was unleashed.

Pictures posted on social media showed bodies strewn amid overturned table and chairs at the wedding hall.

The bomber struck the men’s reception area, officials said.

“Everybody was running,” a waiter at the hall, Sayed Agha Shah, said after the blast.

“Several of our waiters were killed and wounded.”

The attack came as the Taliban and the United States are trying to negotiate an agreement on the withdrawal of U.S. forces in exchange for a Taliban commitment on security and peace talks with Afghanistan’s U.S.-backed government.

It follows a bomb attack on a mosque in Pakistan on Friday that killed a brother of Taliban leader Haibatullah Akhundzada, reports metro.co.uk.

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ISIS claim responsibility for Kabul wedding suicide bombing

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ISIS claim responsibility for Kabul wedding suicide bombing

ISIS has claimed responsibility for a suicide attack at a wedding party in Kabul.

The bomb blast killed at least 63 people and injured another 182 in the Afghan capital on Saturday night.

The venue was packed with party-goers and children when the terrifying attack was unleashed.

Pictures posted on social media showed bodies strewn amid overturned table and chairs at the wedding hall.

The bomber struck the men’s reception area, officials said.

“Everybody was running,” a waiter at the hall, Sayed Agha Shah, said after the blast.

“Several of our waiters were killed and wounded.”

The attack came as the Taliban and the United States are trying to negotiate an agreement on the withdrawal of U.S. forces in exchange for a Taliban commitment on security and peace talks with Afghanistan’s U.S.-backed government.

It follows a bomb attack on a mosque in Pakistan on Friday that killed a brother of Taliban leader Haibatullah Akhundzada, reports metro.co.uk.

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Tens of thousands of black-clad Hong Kong protesters have once again flooded the streets of the Chinese territory, for the eleventh straight week of anti-government demonstrations.

While only a rally at Victoria Park was permitted to proceed, as police denied a permit for a 3.7-kilometre march to Hong Kong’s central business district, the rally quickly became a march as crowds spilled out into neighboring streets and moved west towards the original destination.

As tropical rain began to pour down, protesters remained undeterred and became a sea of colourful umbrellas, streaming through the neighborhood of Wan Chai. They marched to the beat of a stationary drummer, while a speaker stood on pedestal with a microphone, leading a chant of: “Carrie Lam, step down!”

Protests were originally sparked by a now-shelved extradition bill that would allow suspects to be extradited to mainland China for trial, but have broadened into a wider movement against Chinese interference in the semi-autonomous region.

When Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule from its previous British colonial overseer in 1997, a framework called ‘One Country Two Systems’ was established to protect the unique civil liberties and freedoms, unseen on the mainland.

Demands

Sunday’s mass march was organized by the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the same group that drew millions of people to the streets in recent months.

“If [the Hong Kong Government and Beijing] think they can simply wait for our campaign to die down, they are dead wrong,” says Bonnie Leung, vice-convener of CHRF.

“They can’t scare us away from the campaign using violence and [threats]. Hongkongers will soldier on until [the government responds to our five demands].”

Those demands include the complete withdrawal of the proposed extradition bill, universal suffrage and amnesty for all those arrested in connection with the protests.

Leung also reiterated the peaceful nature of Sunday’s march, encouraging all the “brave” protesters – meaning the more radical ones – to partake.

Most demonstrations begin peacefully, but some have devolved into chaotic confrontations. Protesters have in recent weeks thrown bricks and projectiles at the police, who have used tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper-spray, and batons on protesters.

The peaceful marketing of Sunday’s protest – “Peaceful, Rational, Nonviolent” – is an effort to restore the image of the pro-democracy movement after this past week’s polarizing airport protest.

After a five-day airport occupation that forced hundreds of flights to be cancelled, a group of protesters on Tuesday night beat and tied up two mainland Chinese men.

The incident has tarnished the movement’s image and caused a public outcry.

The Chinese government has also ramped up its fervor, saying radical protesters were showing signs of “terrorism” and circulating footage of troop build-ups in the bordering mainland city of Shenzhen.

Police say they’ve arrested more than 700 people since mass demonstrations kicked off in early June.

Since last weekend’s escalation, the past week has been relatively quiet as protesters and police alike seemed to take a few days to regroup. Several demonstrationsunfolded Saturday, including a teacher rally, a pro-government rally, and an anti-government march, reports al-Jazeera.

Continue Reading

News

Published

on

By

Tens of thousands of black-clad Hong Kong protesters have once again flooded the streets of the Chinese territory, for the eleventh straight week of anti-government demonstrations.

While only a rally at Victoria Park was permitted to proceed, as police denied a permit for a 3.7-kilometre march to Hong Kong’s central business district, the rally quickly became a march as crowds spilled out into neighboring streets and moved west towards the original destination.

As tropical rain began to pour down, protesters remained undeterred and became a sea of colourful umbrellas, streaming through the neighborhood of Wan Chai. They marched to the beat of a stationary drummer, while a speaker stood on pedestal with a microphone, leading a chant of: “Carrie Lam, step down!”

Protests were originally sparked by a now-shelved extradition bill that would allow suspects to be extradited to mainland China for trial, but have broadened into a wider movement against Chinese interference in the semi-autonomous region.

When Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule from its previous British colonial overseer in 1997, a framework called ‘One Country Two Systems’ was established to protect the unique civil liberties and freedoms, unseen on the mainland.

Demands

Sunday’s mass march was organized by the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the same group that drew millions of people to the streets in recent months.

“If [the Hong Kong Government and Beijing] think they can simply wait for our campaign to die down, they are dead wrong,” says Bonnie Leung, vice-convener of CHRF.

“They can’t scare us away from the campaign using violence and [threats]. Hongkongers will soldier on until [the government responds to our five demands].”

Those demands include the complete withdrawal of the proposed extradition bill, universal suffrage and amnesty for all those arrested in connection with the protests.

Leung also reiterated the peaceful nature of Sunday’s march, encouraging all the “brave” protesters – meaning the more radical ones – to partake.

Most demonstrations begin peacefully, but some have devolved into chaotic confrontations. Protesters have in recent weeks thrown bricks and projectiles at the police, who have used tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper-spray, and batons on protesters.

The peaceful marketing of Sunday’s protest – “Peaceful, Rational, Nonviolent” – is an effort to restore the image of the pro-democracy movement after this past week’s polarizing airport protest.

After a five-day airport occupation that forced hundreds of flights to be cancelled, a group of protesters on Tuesday night beat and tied up two mainland Chinese men.

The incident has tarnished the movement’s image and caused a public outcry.

The Chinese government has also ramped up its fervor, saying radical protesters were showing signs of “terrorism” and circulating footage of troop build-ups in the bordering mainland city of Shenzhen.

Police say they’ve arrested more than 700 people since mass demonstrations kicked off in early June.

Since last weekend’s escalation, the past week has been relatively quiet as protesters and police alike seemed to take a few days to regroup. Several demonstrationsunfolded Saturday, including a teacher rally, a pro-government rally, and an anti-government march, reports al-Jazeera.

Continue Reading

News

Published

on

By

Tens of thousands of black-clad Hong Kong protesters have once again flooded the streets of the Chinese territory, for the eleventh straight week of anti-government demonstrations.

While only a rally at Victoria Park was permitted to proceed, as police denied a permit for a 3.7-kilometre march to Hong Kong’s central business district, the rally quickly became a march as crowds spilled out into neighboring streets and moved west towards the original destination.

As tropical rain began to pour down, protesters remained undeterred and became a sea of colourful umbrellas, streaming through the neighborhood of Wan Chai. They marched to the beat of a stationary drummer, while a speaker stood on pedestal with a microphone, leading a chant of: “Carrie Lam, step down!”

Protests were originally sparked by a now-shelved extradition bill that would allow suspects to be extradited to mainland China for trial, but have broadened into a wider movement against Chinese interference in the semi-autonomous region.

When Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule from its previous British colonial overseer in 1997, a framework called ‘One Country Two Systems’ was established to protect the unique civil liberties and freedoms, unseen on the mainland.

Demands

Sunday’s mass march was organized by the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the same group that drew millions of people to the streets in recent months.

“If [the Hong Kong Government and Beijing] think they can simply wait for our campaign to die down, they are dead wrong,” says Bonnie Leung, vice-convener of CHRF.

“They can’t scare us away from the campaign using violence and [threats]. Hongkongers will soldier on until [the government responds to our five demands].”

Those demands include the complete withdrawal of the proposed extradition bill, universal suffrage and amnesty for all those arrested in connection with the protests.

Leung also reiterated the peaceful nature of Sunday’s march, encouraging all the “brave” protesters – meaning the more radical ones – to partake.

Most demonstrations begin peacefully, but some have devolved into chaotic confrontations. Protesters have in recent weeks thrown bricks and projectiles at the police, who have used tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper-spray, and batons on protesters.

The peaceful marketing of Sunday’s protest – “Peaceful, Rational, Nonviolent” – is an effort to restore the image of the pro-democracy movement after this past week’s polarizing airport protest.

After a five-day airport occupation that forced hundreds of flights to be cancelled, a group of protesters on Tuesday night beat and tied up two mainland Chinese men.

The incident has tarnished the movement’s image and caused a public outcry.

The Chinese government has also ramped up its fervor, saying radical protesters were showing signs of “terrorism” and circulating footage of troop build-ups in the bordering mainland city of Shenzhen.

Police say they’ve arrested more than 700 people since mass demonstrations kicked off in early June.

Since last weekend’s escalation, the past week has been relatively quiet as protesters and police alike seemed to take a few days to regroup. Several demonstrationsunfolded Saturday, including a teacher rally, a pro-government rally, and an anti-government march, reports al-Jazeera.

Continue Reading

News

Published

on

By

Tens of thousands of black-clad Hong Kong protesters have once again flooded the streets of the Chinese territory, for the eleventh straight week of anti-government demonstrations.

While only a rally at Victoria Park was permitted to proceed, as police denied a permit for a 3.7-kilometre march to Hong Kong’s central business district, the rally quickly became a march as crowds spilled out into neighboring streets and moved west towards the original destination.

As tropical rain began to pour down, protesters remained undeterred and became a sea of colourful umbrellas, streaming through the neighborhood of Wan Chai. They marched to the beat of a stationary drummer, while a speaker stood on pedestal with a microphone, leading a chant of: “Carrie Lam, step down!”

Protests were originally sparked by a now-shelved extradition bill that would allow suspects to be extradited to mainland China for trial, but have broadened into a wider movement against Chinese interference in the semi-autonomous region.

When Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule from its previous British colonial overseer in 1997, a framework called ‘One Country Two Systems’ was established to protect the unique civil liberties and freedoms, unseen on the mainland.

Demands

Sunday’s mass march was organized by the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the same group that drew millions of people to the streets in recent months.

“If [the Hong Kong Government and Beijing] think they can simply wait for our campaign to die down, they are dead wrong,” says Bonnie Leung, vice-convener of CHRF.

“They can’t scare us away from the campaign using violence and [threats]. Hongkongers will soldier on until [the government responds to our five demands].”

Those demands include the complete withdrawal of the proposed extradition bill, universal suffrage and amnesty for all those arrested in connection with the protests.

Leung also reiterated the peaceful nature of Sunday’s march, encouraging all the “brave” protesters – meaning the more radical ones – to partake.

Most demonstrations begin peacefully, but some have devolved into chaotic confrontations. Protesters have in recent weeks thrown bricks and projectiles at the police, who have used tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper-spray, and batons on protesters.

The peaceful marketing of Sunday’s protest – “Peaceful, Rational, Nonviolent” – is an effort to restore the image of the pro-democracy movement after this past week’s polarizing airport protest.

After a five-day airport occupation that forced hundreds of flights to be cancelled, a group of protesters on Tuesday night beat and tied up two mainland Chinese men.

The incident has tarnished the movement’s image and caused a public outcry.

The Chinese government has also ramped up its fervor, saying radical protesters were showing signs of “terrorism” and circulating footage of troop build-ups in the bordering mainland city of Shenzhen.

Police say they’ve arrested more than 700 people since mass demonstrations kicked off in early June.

Since last weekend’s escalation, the past week has been relatively quiet as protesters and police alike seemed to take a few days to regroup. Several demonstrationsunfolded Saturday, including a teacher rally, a pro-government rally, and an anti-government march, reports al-Jazeera.

Continue Reading

News

Thousands resume Hong Kong protests

Published

on

By

Thousands resume Hong Kong protests

Tens of thousands of black-clad Hong Kong protesters have once again flooded the streets of the Chinese territory, for the eleventh straight week of anti-government demonstrations.

While only a rally at Victoria Park was permitted to proceed, as police denied a permit for a 3.7-kilometre march to Hong Kong’s central business district, the rally quickly became a march as crowds spilled out into neighboring streets and moved west towards the original destination.

As tropical rain began to pour down, protesters remained undeterred and became a sea of colourful umbrellas, streaming through the neighborhood of Wan Chai. They marched to the beat of a stationary drummer, while a speaker stood on pedestal with a microphone, leading a chant of: “Carrie Lam, step down!”

Protests were originally sparked by a now-shelved extradition bill that would allow suspects to be extradited to mainland China for trial, but have broadened into a wider movement against Chinese interference in the semi-autonomous region.

When Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule from its previous British colonial overseer in 1997, a framework called ‘One Country Two Systems’ was established to protect the unique civil liberties and freedoms, unseen on the mainland.

Demands

Sunday’s mass march was organized by the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the same group that drew millions of people to the streets in recent months.

“If [the Hong Kong Government and Beijing] think they can simply wait for our campaign to die down, they are dead wrong,” says Bonnie Leung, vice-convener of CHRF.

“They can’t scare us away from the campaign using violence and [threats]. Hongkongers will soldier on until [the government responds to our five demands].”

Those demands include the complete withdrawal of the proposed extradition bill, universal suffrage and amnesty for all those arrested in connection with the protests.

Leung also reiterated the peaceful nature of Sunday’s march, encouraging all the “brave” protesters – meaning the more radical ones – to partake.

Most demonstrations begin peacefully, but some have devolved into chaotic confrontations. Protesters have in recent weeks thrown bricks and projectiles at the police, who have used tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper-spray, and batons on protesters.

The peaceful marketing of Sunday’s protest – “Peaceful, Rational, Nonviolent” – is an effort to restore the image of the pro-democracy movement after this past week’s polarizing airport protest.

After a five-day airport occupation that forced hundreds of flights to be cancelled, a group of protesters on Tuesday night beat and tied up two mainland Chinese men.

The incident has tarnished the movement’s image and caused a public outcry.

The Chinese government has also ramped up its fervor, saying radical protesters were showing signs of “terrorism” and circulating footage of troop build-ups in the bordering mainland city of Shenzhen.

Police say they’ve arrested more than 700 people since mass demonstrations kicked off in early June.

Since last weekend’s escalation, the past week has been relatively quiet as protesters and police alike seemed to take a few days to regroup. Several demonstrationsunfolded Saturday, including a teacher rally, a pro-government rally, and an anti-government march, reports al-Jazeera.

Continue Reading

News

Thousands resume Hong Kong protests

Published

on

By

Thousands resume Hong Kong protests

Tens of thousands of black-clad Hong Kong protesters have once again flooded the streets of the Chinese territory, for the eleventh straight week of anti-government demonstrations.

While only a rally at Victoria Park was permitted to proceed, as police denied a permit for a 3.7-kilometre march to Hong Kong’s central business district, the rally quickly became a march as crowds spilled out into neighboring streets and moved west towards the original destination.

As tropical rain began to pour down, protesters remained undeterred and became a sea of colourful umbrellas, streaming through the neighborhood of Wan Chai. They marched to the beat of a stationary drummer, while a speaker stood on pedestal with a microphone, leading a chant of: “Carrie Lam, step down!”

Protests were originally sparked by a now-shelved extradition bill that would allow suspects to be extradited to mainland China for trial, but have broadened into a wider movement against Chinese interference in the semi-autonomous region.

When Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule from its previous British colonial overseer in 1997, a framework called ‘One Country Two Systems’ was established to protect the unique civil liberties and freedoms, unseen on the mainland.

Demands

Sunday’s mass march was organized by the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the same group that drew millions of people to the streets in recent months.

“If [the Hong Kong Government and Beijing] think they can simply wait for our campaign to die down, they are dead wrong,” says Bonnie Leung, vice-convener of CHRF.

“They can’t scare us away from the campaign using violence and [threats]. Hongkongers will soldier on until [the government responds to our five demands].”

Those demands include the complete withdrawal of the proposed extradition bill, universal suffrage and amnesty for all those arrested in connection with the protests.

Leung also reiterated the peaceful nature of Sunday’s march, encouraging all the “brave” protesters – meaning the more radical ones – to partake.

Most demonstrations begin peacefully, but some have devolved into chaotic confrontations. Protesters have in recent weeks thrown bricks and projectiles at the police, who have used tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper-spray, and batons on protesters.

The peaceful marketing of Sunday’s protest – “Peaceful, Rational, Nonviolent” – is an effort to restore the image of the pro-democracy movement after this past week’s polarizing airport protest.

After a five-day airport occupation that forced hundreds of flights to be cancelled, a group of protesters on Tuesday night beat and tied up two mainland Chinese men.

The incident has tarnished the movement’s image and caused a public outcry.

The Chinese government has also ramped up its fervor, saying radical protesters were showing signs of “terrorism” and circulating footage of troop build-ups in the bordering mainland city of Shenzhen.

Police say they’ve arrested more than 700 people since mass demonstrations kicked off in early June.

Since last weekend’s escalation, the past week has been relatively quiet as protesters and police alike seemed to take a few days to regroup. Several demonstrationsunfolded Saturday, including a teacher rally, a pro-government rally, and an anti-government march, reports al-Jazeera.

Continue Reading

News

Thousands resume Hong Kong protests

Published

on

By

Thousands resume Hong Kong protests

Tens of thousands of black-clad Hong Kong protesters have once again flooded the streets of the Chinese territory, for the eleventh straight week of anti-government demonstrations.

While only a rally at Victoria Park was permitted to proceed, as police denied a permit for a 3.7-kilometre march to Hong Kong’s central business district, the rally quickly became a march as crowds spilled out into neighboring streets and moved west towards the original destination.

As tropical rain began to pour down, protesters remained undeterred and became a sea of colourful umbrellas, streaming through the neighborhood of Wan Chai. They marched to the beat of a stationary drummer, while a speaker stood on pedestal with a microphone, leading a chant of: “Carrie Lam, step down!”

Protests were originally sparked by a now-shelved extradition bill that would allow suspects to be extradited to mainland China for trial, but have broadened into a wider movement against Chinese interference in the semi-autonomous region.

When Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule from its previous British colonial overseer in 1997, a framework called ‘One Country Two Systems’ was established to protect the unique civil liberties and freedoms, unseen on the mainland.

Demands

Sunday’s mass march was organized by the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the same group that drew millions of people to the streets in recent months.

“If [the Hong Kong Government and Beijing] think they can simply wait for our campaign to die down, they are dead wrong,” says Bonnie Leung, vice-convener of CHRF.

“They can’t scare us away from the campaign using violence and [threats]. Hongkongers will soldier on until [the government responds to our five demands].”

Those demands include the complete withdrawal of the proposed extradition bill, universal suffrage and amnesty for all those arrested in connection with the protests.

Leung also reiterated the peaceful nature of Sunday’s march, encouraging all the “brave” protesters – meaning the more radical ones – to partake.

Most demonstrations begin peacefully, but some have devolved into chaotic confrontations. Protesters have in recent weeks thrown bricks and projectiles at the police, who have used tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper-spray, and batons on protesters.

The peaceful marketing of Sunday’s protest – “Peaceful, Rational, Nonviolent” – is an effort to restore the image of the pro-democracy movement after this past week’s polarizing airport protest.

After a five-day airport occupation that forced hundreds of flights to be cancelled, a group of protesters on Tuesday night beat and tied up two mainland Chinese men.

The incident has tarnished the movement’s image and caused a public outcry.

The Chinese government has also ramped up its fervor, saying radical protesters were showing signs of “terrorism” and circulating footage of troop build-ups in the bordering mainland city of Shenzhen.

Police say they’ve arrested more than 700 people since mass demonstrations kicked off in early June.

Since last weekend’s escalation, the past week has been relatively quiet as protesters and police alike seemed to take a few days to regroup. Several demonstrationsunfolded Saturday, including a teacher rally, a pro-government rally, and an anti-government march, reports al-Jazeera.

Continue Reading

News

Thousands resume Hong Kong protests

Published

on

By

Thousands resume Hong Kong protests

Tens of thousands of black-clad Hong Kong protesters have once again flooded the streets of the Chinese territory, for the eleventh straight week of anti-government demonstrations.

While only a rally at Victoria Park was permitted to proceed, as police denied a permit for a 3.7-kilometre march to Hong Kong’s central business district, the rally quickly became a march as crowds spilled out into neighboring streets and moved west towards the original destination.

As tropical rain began to pour down, protesters remained undeterred and became a sea of colourful umbrellas, streaming through the neighborhood of Wan Chai. They marched to the beat of a stationary drummer, while a speaker stood on pedestal with a microphone, leading a chant of: “Carrie Lam, step down!”

Protests were originally sparked by a now-shelved extradition bill that would allow suspects to be extradited to mainland China for trial, but have broadened into a wider movement against Chinese interference in the semi-autonomous region.

When Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule from its previous British colonial overseer in 1997, a framework called ‘One Country Two Systems’ was established to protect the unique civil liberties and freedoms, unseen on the mainland.

Demands

Sunday’s mass march was organized by the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the same group that drew millions of people to the streets in recent months.

“If [the Hong Kong Government and Beijing] think they can simply wait for our campaign to die down, they are dead wrong,” says Bonnie Leung, vice-convener of CHRF.

“They can’t scare us away from the campaign using violence and [threats]. Hongkongers will soldier on until [the government responds to our five demands].”

Those demands include the complete withdrawal of the proposed extradition bill, universal suffrage and amnesty for all those arrested in connection with the protests.

Leung also reiterated the peaceful nature of Sunday’s march, encouraging all the “brave” protesters – meaning the more radical ones – to partake.

Most demonstrations begin peacefully, but some have devolved into chaotic confrontations. Protesters have in recent weeks thrown bricks and projectiles at the police, who have used tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper-spray, and batons on protesters.

The peaceful marketing of Sunday’s protest – “Peaceful, Rational, Nonviolent” – is an effort to restore the image of the pro-democracy movement after this past week’s polarizing airport protest.

After a five-day airport occupation that forced hundreds of flights to be cancelled, a group of protesters on Tuesday night beat and tied up two mainland Chinese men.

The incident has tarnished the movement’s image and caused a public outcry.

The Chinese government has also ramped up its fervor, saying radical protesters were showing signs of “terrorism” and circulating footage of troop build-ups in the bordering mainland city of Shenzhen.

Police say they’ve arrested more than 700 people since mass demonstrations kicked off in early June.

Since last weekend’s escalation, the past week has been relatively quiet as protesters and police alike seemed to take a few days to regroup. Several demonstrationsunfolded Saturday, including a teacher rally, a pro-government rally, and an anti-government march, reports al-Jazeera.

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