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Oil jumps on expectations producers may cut supply after 4% slump

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Oil jumps on expectations producers may cut supply after 4% slump

Oil futures jumped more than $1 a barrel on Thursday, recovering half of the nearly 5% losses in the previous session, on expectations that lower prices may lead to production cuts.

Brent crude had rebounded to $57.75 a barrel, up $1.52, or 2.7%, from its last close by 0401 GMT, while U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures jumped $1.51, or 2.96%, to $52.60 a barrel.

Both contracts hit their lowest levels since January on Wednesday after a surprise build in U.S. crude inventories added to worries that the China-U.S. trade war could further dampen demand growth this year.

Analysts said that crude prices were moving higher on the expectation that Saudi Arabia, the world’s biggest oil exporter, and other producers in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) may take action to support the market by reducing supply.

“The threshold is $60 a barrel and if you go below that for a significant period of time, I would expect supplies to be taken off the market in order to support prices up,” said Virendra Chauhan, an oil analyst at Energy Aspects in Singapore.

Bloomberg in a report on Wednesday cited a Saudi official saying that the country is in talks with other producers to take action to halt the oil price slide.

“Trade war rhetoric will continue to guide markets, but the comments from Saudi Arabia could lead to unprecedented action to stabilize prices,” said Alfonso Esparza, a Toronto-based senior market analyst at Oanda.

“It is hard to imagine what that would look like given how hard it was to get the OPEC+ to agree to the production limit agreement, but given the potential free fall from crude if the trade war continues, no option is off the table,” he said, referring to OPEC+, a group including OPEC and non-OPEC producers such as Russia.

Esparza added that a weaker U.S. dollar has also lent support to the oil price rebound.

The dollar index, which measures the greenback against six other major currencies, has declined 1% since July 31, the day before the United States escalated its trade dispute with China by vowing to impose more tariffs, setting in motion retaliatory steps by China, reports Reuters.

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Energy

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

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Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

Oil prices slipped on Tuesday, offsetting narrow gains in the previous session, as sluggish demand forecasts countered expectations that major producers would prop up oil prices by limiting crude oil output.

International benchmark Brent crude futures LCOc1 were down 18 cents or 0.3%, from the previous settlement, to $58.39 a barrel by 0310 GMT.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) CLc1 futures were at $54.81 per barrel, down by 12 cents, or 0.2%, from the last close.

“Although the outlook remains bleak, oil prices have remained anchored this week after a rapid response from Saudi Arabia, who is serious about stepping in to defend the oil price,” Stephen Innes, managing partner at VM Markets Pte Ltd said in a note.

Saudi Arabia, the de-facto leader of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said late last week it plans to keep its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to help drain global oil inventories.

Analysts expect the country to support prices ahead of its plans to float Saudi Aramco, in what could be the world’s largest initial public offering (IPO).

Saudi Aramco was ready for its IPO, but the timing for the deal will be decided by its sole shareholder, the Saudi government, a senior executive said on Monday.

Kuwait on Monday also reiterated its commitment to OPEC+ supply curbs after Oil Minister Khaled al-Fadhel said Kuwait had cut its own output by more than required by the accord.

OPEC and its allies, known as OPEC+, have agreed to cut 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) since Jan. 1.

But booming U.S. shale oil production continues to chip away at efforts to limit the global supply overhang, weighing on prices.

U.S. oil output from seven major shale formations is expected to rise by 85,000 barrels per day (bpd) in September, to a record 8.77 million bpd, the U.S. Energy Information Administration forecast in a report.

Gloomy forecasts for the global economy and oil demand growth have also dragged on oil prices as the trade dispute between the United States and China escalates.

“The swift reaction from Saudi Arabia will likely stabilize oil prices, but the oil price probably won’t move much above $60 per barrel until there is evidence of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations,” said Innes.

China’s central bank lowered its official yuan midpoint for the ninth straight day to a fresh 11-year low on Tuesday to reflect broad weakness in the local unit.

A lower yuan raises the cost of dollar-denominated oil imports in China, the world’s biggest crude oil importer, reports Reuters.

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Energy

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

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Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

Oil prices slipped on Tuesday, offsetting narrow gains in the previous session, as sluggish demand forecasts countered expectations that major producers would prop up oil prices by limiting crude oil output.

International benchmark Brent crude futures LCOc1 were down 18 cents or 0.3%, from the previous settlement, to $58.39 a barrel by 0310 GMT.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) CLc1 futures were at $54.81 per barrel, down by 12 cents, or 0.2%, from the last close.

“Although the outlook remains bleak, oil prices have remained anchored this week after a rapid response from Saudi Arabia, who is serious about stepping in to defend the oil price,” Stephen Innes, managing partner at VM Markets Pte Ltd said in a note.

Saudi Arabia, the de-facto leader of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said late last week it plans to keep its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to help drain global oil inventories.

Analysts expect the country to support prices ahead of its plans to float Saudi Aramco, in what could be the world’s largest initial public offering (IPO).

Saudi Aramco was ready for its IPO, but the timing for the deal will be decided by its sole shareholder, the Saudi government, a senior executive said on Monday.

Kuwait on Monday also reiterated its commitment to OPEC+ supply curbs after Oil Minister Khaled al-Fadhel said Kuwait had cut its own output by more than required by the accord.

OPEC and its allies, known as OPEC+, have agreed to cut 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) since Jan. 1.

But booming U.S. shale oil production continues to chip away at efforts to limit the global supply overhang, weighing on prices.

U.S. oil output from seven major shale formations is expected to rise by 85,000 barrels per day (bpd) in September, to a record 8.77 million bpd, the U.S. Energy Information Administration forecast in a report.

Gloomy forecasts for the global economy and oil demand growth have also dragged on oil prices as the trade dispute between the United States and China escalates.

“The swift reaction from Saudi Arabia will likely stabilize oil prices, but the oil price probably won’t move much above $60 per barrel until there is evidence of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations,” said Innes.

China’s central bank lowered its official yuan midpoint for the ninth straight day to a fresh 11-year low on Tuesday to reflect broad weakness in the local unit.

A lower yuan raises the cost of dollar-denominated oil imports in China, the world’s biggest crude oil importer, reports Reuters.

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Energy

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

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on

By

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

Oil prices slipped on Tuesday, offsetting narrow gains in the previous session, as sluggish demand forecasts countered expectations that major producers would prop up oil prices by limiting crude oil output.

International benchmark Brent crude futures LCOc1 were down 18 cents or 0.3%, from the previous settlement, to $58.39 a barrel by 0310 GMT.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) CLc1 futures were at $54.81 per barrel, down by 12 cents, or 0.2%, from the last close.

“Although the outlook remains bleak, oil prices have remained anchored this week after a rapid response from Saudi Arabia, who is serious about stepping in to defend the oil price,” Stephen Innes, managing partner at VM Markets Pte Ltd said in a note.

Saudi Arabia, the de-facto leader of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said late last week it plans to keep its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to help drain global oil inventories.

Analysts expect the country to support prices ahead of its plans to float Saudi Aramco, in what could be the world’s largest initial public offering (IPO).

Saudi Aramco was ready for its IPO, but the timing for the deal will be decided by its sole shareholder, the Saudi government, a senior executive said on Monday.

Kuwait on Monday also reiterated its commitment to OPEC+ supply curbs after Oil Minister Khaled al-Fadhel said Kuwait had cut its own output by more than required by the accord.

OPEC and its allies, known as OPEC+, have agreed to cut 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) since Jan. 1.

But booming U.S. shale oil production continues to chip away at efforts to limit the global supply overhang, weighing on prices.

U.S. oil output from seven major shale formations is expected to rise by 85,000 barrels per day (bpd) in September, to a record 8.77 million bpd, the U.S. Energy Information Administration forecast in a report.

Gloomy forecasts for the global economy and oil demand growth have also dragged on oil prices as the trade dispute between the United States and China escalates.

“The swift reaction from Saudi Arabia will likely stabilize oil prices, but the oil price probably won’t move much above $60 per barrel until there is evidence of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations,” said Innes.

China’s central bank lowered its official yuan midpoint for the ninth straight day to a fresh 11-year low on Tuesday to reflect broad weakness in the local unit.

A lower yuan raises the cost of dollar-denominated oil imports in China, the world’s biggest crude oil importer, reports Reuters.

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Energy

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

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on

By

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

Oil prices slipped on Tuesday, offsetting narrow gains in the previous session, as sluggish demand forecasts countered expectations that major producers would prop up oil prices by limiting crude oil output.

International benchmark Brent crude futures LCOc1 were down 18 cents or 0.3%, from the previous settlement, to $58.39 a barrel by 0310 GMT.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) CLc1 futures were at $54.81 per barrel, down by 12 cents, or 0.2%, from the last close.

“Although the outlook remains bleak, oil prices have remained anchored this week after a rapid response from Saudi Arabia, who is serious about stepping in to defend the oil price,” Stephen Innes, managing partner at VM Markets Pte Ltd said in a note.

Saudi Arabia, the de-facto leader of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said late last week it plans to keep its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to help drain global oil inventories.

Analysts expect the country to support prices ahead of its plans to float Saudi Aramco, in what could be the world’s largest initial public offering (IPO).

Saudi Aramco was ready for its IPO, but the timing for the deal will be decided by its sole shareholder, the Saudi government, a senior executive said on Monday.

Kuwait on Monday also reiterated its commitment to OPEC+ supply curbs after Oil Minister Khaled al-Fadhel said Kuwait had cut its own output by more than required by the accord.

OPEC and its allies, known as OPEC+, have agreed to cut 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) since Jan. 1.

But booming U.S. shale oil production continues to chip away at efforts to limit the global supply overhang, weighing on prices.

U.S. oil output from seven major shale formations is expected to rise by 85,000 barrels per day (bpd) in September, to a record 8.77 million bpd, the U.S. Energy Information Administration forecast in a report.

Gloomy forecasts for the global economy and oil demand growth have also dragged on oil prices as the trade dispute between the United States and China escalates.

“The swift reaction from Saudi Arabia will likely stabilize oil prices, but the oil price probably won’t move much above $60 per barrel until there is evidence of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations,” said Innes.

China’s central bank lowered its official yuan midpoint for the ninth straight day to a fresh 11-year low on Tuesday to reflect broad weakness in the local unit.

A lower yuan raises the cost of dollar-denominated oil imports in China, the world’s biggest crude oil importer, reports Reuters.

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Energy

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

Published

on

By

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

Oil prices slipped on Tuesday, offsetting narrow gains in the previous session, as sluggish demand forecasts countered expectations that major producers would prop up oil prices by limiting crude oil output.

International benchmark Brent crude futures LCOc1 were down 18 cents or 0.3%, from the previous settlement, to $58.39 a barrel by 0310 GMT.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) CLc1 futures were at $54.81 per barrel, down by 12 cents, or 0.2%, from the last close.

“Although the outlook remains bleak, oil prices have remained anchored this week after a rapid response from Saudi Arabia, who is serious about stepping in to defend the oil price,” Stephen Innes, managing partner at VM Markets Pte Ltd said in a note.

Saudi Arabia, the de-facto leader of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said late last week it plans to keep its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to help drain global oil inventories.

Analysts expect the country to support prices ahead of its plans to float Saudi Aramco, in what could be the world’s largest initial public offering (IPO).

Saudi Aramco was ready for its IPO, but the timing for the deal will be decided by its sole shareholder, the Saudi government, a senior executive said on Monday.

Kuwait on Monday also reiterated its commitment to OPEC+ supply curbs after Oil Minister Khaled al-Fadhel said Kuwait had cut its own output by more than required by the accord.

OPEC and its allies, known as OPEC+, have agreed to cut 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) since Jan. 1.

But booming U.S. shale oil production continues to chip away at efforts to limit the global supply overhang, weighing on prices.

U.S. oil output from seven major shale formations is expected to rise by 85,000 barrels per day (bpd) in September, to a record 8.77 million bpd, the U.S. Energy Information Administration forecast in a report.

Gloomy forecasts for the global economy and oil demand growth have also dragged on oil prices as the trade dispute between the United States and China escalates.

“The swift reaction from Saudi Arabia will likely stabilize oil prices, but the oil price probably won’t move much above $60 per barrel until there is evidence of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations,” said Innes.

China’s central bank lowered its official yuan midpoint for the ninth straight day to a fresh 11-year low on Tuesday to reflect broad weakness in the local unit.

A lower yuan raises the cost of dollar-denominated oil imports in China, the world’s biggest crude oil importer, reports Reuters.

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Energy

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

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on

By

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

Oil prices slipped on Tuesday, offsetting narrow gains in the previous session, as sluggish demand forecasts countered expectations that major producers would prop up oil prices by limiting crude oil output.

International benchmark Brent crude futures LCOc1 were down 18 cents or 0.3%, from the previous settlement, to $58.39 a barrel by 0310 GMT.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) CLc1 futures were at $54.81 per barrel, down by 12 cents, or 0.2%, from the last close.

“Although the outlook remains bleak, oil prices have remained anchored this week after a rapid response from Saudi Arabia, who is serious about stepping in to defend the oil price,” Stephen Innes, managing partner at VM Markets Pte Ltd said in a note.

Saudi Arabia, the de-facto leader of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said late last week it plans to keep its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to help drain global oil inventories.

Analysts expect the country to support prices ahead of its plans to float Saudi Aramco, in what could be the world’s largest initial public offering (IPO).

Saudi Aramco was ready for its IPO, but the timing for the deal will be decided by its sole shareholder, the Saudi government, a senior executive said on Monday.

Kuwait on Monday also reiterated its commitment to OPEC+ supply curbs after Oil Minister Khaled al-Fadhel said Kuwait had cut its own output by more than required by the accord.

OPEC and its allies, known as OPEC+, have agreed to cut 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) since Jan. 1.

But booming U.S. shale oil production continues to chip away at efforts to limit the global supply overhang, weighing on prices.

U.S. oil output from seven major shale formations is expected to rise by 85,000 barrels per day (bpd) in September, to a record 8.77 million bpd, the U.S. Energy Information Administration forecast in a report.

Gloomy forecasts for the global economy and oil demand growth have also dragged on oil prices as the trade dispute between the United States and China escalates.

“The swift reaction from Saudi Arabia will likely stabilize oil prices, but the oil price probably won’t move much above $60 per barrel until there is evidence of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations,” said Innes.

China’s central bank lowered its official yuan midpoint for the ninth straight day to a fresh 11-year low on Tuesday to reflect broad weakness in the local unit.

A lower yuan raises the cost of dollar-denominated oil imports in China, the world’s biggest crude oil importer, reports Reuters.

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Energy

US-China trade war sends oil climbing

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US-China trade war sends oil climbing

Oil prices rose more than 1% on Tuesday as traders betting on falling prices bought back contracts to lock in profits after declines over the last three sessions due to the escalating trade tensions between China and United States.

Brent prices plunged more than 8% in the three sessions from their close on July 31, with U.S. President Donald Trump vowing to impose new tariffs on Chinese imports, and China making further moves against U.S. agricultural imports.

The United States also responded to a decline in the Chinese yuan on Monday by branding the country a currency manipulator later in the day.

Brent fell more than 3% on Monday as traders worried the ongoing trade dispute between the world’s two biggest oil buyers would dent demand, helping to prompt Tuesday’s short-covering.

International benchmark Brent crude futures LCOc1 climbed 61 cents, or 1%, to $60.42 a barrel by 0544 GMT on Tuesday after earlier dipping to $59.07, the lowest since Jan. 14.

West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude CLc1 futures rose 56 cents, or 1%, to $55.25 per barrel.

“This is a more likely a correction from oversold doom and gloom positions,” said Stephen Innes, managing partner at VM Markets. “But with commodity markets in total disarray, this move should not be confused with a ‘risk-on’, especially in oil markets as the latest trade war escalation is flat out harmful to global growth and by extension, for oil markets.”

The United States accused Beijing of manipulating its currency after China let the yuan drop to its lowest in more than a decade. The weaker yuan would support Chinese exports by making them cheaper, but it would also raise oil-import costs for the world’s biggest importer.

The People’s Bank of China’s firmer-than-expected yuan fixing on Tuesday helped pull the currency away from the recent lows, as did an announced bond sale in the offshore market.

Concerns that the U.S.-China trade conflict has entered a phase of retaliatory action was weighing on sentiments in the oil market, which for the moment is taking less notice of tensions in the Middle East, analysts said.

Iran on Monday said it will no longer tolerate “maritime offences” in the Strait of Hormuz, a day after it seized a second oil tanker that it accused of smuggling fuel.

Oil prices may find some support later this week with a preliminary Reuters poll showing U.S. crude oil inventories were expected to fall for an eighth consecutive week, reports Reuters.

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Energy

Oil gains a fifth day after US stockpile drop amid rate optimism

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Oil gains a fifth day after US stockpile drop amid rate optimism

Oil prices rose for a fifth day on Wednesday, buoyed by a bigger-than-expected drop in U.S. inventories and as investors awaited a widely expected cut in interest rates by the Federal Reserve, the first in more than 10 years.

Brent crude LCOc1 was up 44 cents, or 0.7%, at $65.16 a barrel by 0324 GMT.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude CLc1 gained 41 cents, or 0.7%, to $58.46 a barrel.

“The market is quite optimistic leading into what the Fed is going to do on interest rates and as a result of that we’ll see more demand,” Jonathan Barratt, chief investment officer at Probis Group in Sydney, said by phone, referring to the widely expected cut.

Central bankers in the United States began their two-day meeting on Tuesday and were expected to lower borrowing costs for the first time since the depths of the financial crisis more than a decade ago.

U.S. consumer spending and prices rose moderately in June, pointing to slower economic growth and benign inflation that cemented expectations of Fed rate cuts.

U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday reiterated his call for the Fed to make a large interest rate cut. That would be an unlikely move by the central bankers, Barratt said.

Despite the gains in prices, Brent is set to ease in July due to ongoing worries about demand, heading for a decline of about 2%, while WTI is down 1 cent.

Still, U.S. inventories have been falling in recent weeks suggesting demand concerns are overstated.

Crude stockpiles fell again last week, along with gasoline and distillate inventories, data from industry group the American Petroleum Institute (API) showed on Tuesday.

“There is a definitive seasonal trend emerging as inventory draws continue to beat analysts’ expectations by a mile suggesting analysts have grossly underestimated consumption and the breadth of seasonal demand this year,” VM Markets Pte said in a note.

Crude inventories fell by 6 million barrels in the week ended July 26 to 443 million barrels, compared with analysts’ expectations in a Reuters poll for a decrease of 2.6 million barrels, the API data showed.

If confirmed by U.S. government data on Wednesday morning, the decline would put crude stocks down for a seventh week in a row. That would be longest stretch since they fell for a record 10 consecutive weeks ending in January 2018.

Total crude stockpiles, however, would still be about 3% higher than the five-year average, reports Reuters.

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Business

Ladan out, Shakur in as oil industry’s shake up rocks DPR

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Ladan out, Shakur in as oil industry’s shake up rocks DPR

By: Adeola Yusuf

The reign of Mr. Modacai Ladan as Director of Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR) ended at the weekend as the gale of shake up rocking the oil industry rocked the department.

Ladan who should have retired about two years ago due to age and number of years in active service, was left to enjoy a four year term as the director.

He eventually retired from the DPR, according to a statement by the agency, after 32 years of services.

Sequel to Ladan’s retirement, the agency Deputy Director and Head, Corporate Services Division, Mr Ahmad Shakur has become the Acting Director, the statement read.

It explained that Shakur who was the most senior director in the agency became the Acting Director “in line with the provisions of Circular Ref. No.SGF.50/S.II/C.S/268.

Ladan served between the period of 2015 to 2019.

“The former Director has formally handed over the affairs of the Department to the most senior officer Mr Ahmad Rufai Shakur, the Deputy Director and Head, Corporate Services Division in an Acting capacity.
“ Shakur comes on board with over 32 years’ experience in the oil and gas industry with very robust service records in the regulatory arm of the sector.
“The acting director is a graduate of the Ahmadu Bello University with a Master of Business Administration degree”.

It stated that Shakur held various positions across the value chain of the DPR from the zonal offices to headquarter and had attended numerous management and leadership courses locally and internationally.

It added that this include notable institutions like the Columbia Business School, New York USA and Wharton Business School, Pennsylvania, USA.

“He also embodied with renowned past records in strategic leadership, corporate governance and optimal performance, Shakur is expected to steer the Department to the next level,” it stated

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Business

Shell surges domestic gas distribution by 150%

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Shell surges domestic gas distribution by 150%

 

Shell Nigeria Gas (SNG) has increased its gas distribution capacity by over 150 per cent.
Managing Director, SNG, Ed Ubong, said this at the recent media launch of the 2019 edition of the Shell in Nigeria Briefing Notes, an annual publication detailing the activities of the business interests of the global energy giant in Nigeria.
He said this was due to the safe completion of its second gas train, the Agbara-Ota Capacity Increase Project, which enables the company and its partners to achieve regular gas supply to subscribed industries in Ogun state.
“Apart from increasing the distribution capacity in existing states where it operates, SNG is maturing opportunities to expand its gas distribution network to new states,” he said.
“On completion of its expansion projects, over 1,000 megawatts equivalent of energy will be directly supplied to various industrial parks and manufacturing companies in Nigeria.”
The completed first phase of its pipeline expansion in Abia State is connecting manufacturing industries in the Osisioma area directly to pipeline gas.
It will also deliver pipeline gas to the IPP consortium that provides electricity to the popular Ariaria market in Abia State – one of the largest open stall markets in West Africa, with over 37,000 shops.
The 1st Phase of the Ariaria IPP project commissioned by President Muhammadu Buhari in 2019 currently provides electricity to over 4,000 shops.
Ubong said: “Shell as a leading energy company is committed to supporting the Federal government’s aspiration to grow the domestic gas market, making domestic infrastructure investments under the right commercial conditions and continuing to birth domestic gas projects that will be major game-changers in Nigeria’s quest for cleaner energy sufficiency, industrialisation and economic growth.

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ABUJA MAN REVEALS (FREE) SECRET FRUITS THAT INCREASED MANHOOD AND LASTING POWER IN 7DAYS

 

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