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Oil hits six-week high on hopes of extended OPEC cuts

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Oil hits six-week high on hopes of extended OPEC cuts

Oil futures hit a six-week high on Tuesday, rising for a fifth day on optimism that OPEC and other countries may agree to extend production cuts in a bid to support prices.

Brent LCOc1 was up 26 cents, or 0.4 per cent, at 62.85 dollars a barrel by 0349 GMT, while U.S. crude CLc1 was 27 cents, or 0.5 per cent, higher at 58.12 dollars a barrel.

Brent touched its highest since August 1, while U.S. crude rose to the highest since July 31.

U.S. oil gained more than 2 per cent on Monday, while Brent finished the day 1.7 per cent higher as the market reacted to the appointment by Saudi Arabia’s king of his son, Abdulaziz bin Salman, as energy minister on Sunday.

Abdulaziz, a long-time member of the Saudi delegation to the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said the pillars of Saudi Arabia’s policy would not change and a global deal to cut oil production by 1.2 million barrels per day would be maintained.

He added that the so-called OPEC+ alliance, made up of OPEC and non-OPEC countries including Russia, would be in place for the long term.

A meeting of OPEC and OPEC+ countries in Abu Dhabi this week “is stirring up hopes for additional supply cuts,” said Stephen Innes, Asia Pacific market strategist at AxiTrader.

Still, Russia’s oil output in August exceeded its quota under the OPEC+ agreements.

“Markets will need to see concrete progress on the production front, even as the world’s economy slows, to sustain gains,” said Jeffrey Halley, senior market analyst at OANDA.

Should oil end Tuesday higher it will be the longest run of gains since late July but headwinds remain as the U.S.-China trade war rumbles on.

Expectations

Executives at the annual Asia Pacific Petroleum Conference said on Monday they expect oil prices this year to be pressured by uncertainties surrounding the global economy, the U.S.-China trade war and increasing U.S. supplies.

In the United States, crude stockpiles are likely to have fallen for a fourth consecutive week last week, a preliminary Reuters’ poll showed on Monday.

Five analysts polled by Reuters estimated, on average, that crude inventories fell 2.6 million barrels in the week to September 6.

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Energy

Investors turn heat on Big Oil ahead of UN climate summit

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Investors turn heat on Big Oil ahead of UN climate summit

Investors managing $15 trillion in assets turned up the heat on oil and gas sector on Wednesday ahead of a United Nations summit in New York aimed at accelerating efforts to fight climate change.

Energy companies are on the front line of the global transition to a low-carbon economy, with investors potentially on the hook for hefty losses if the companies do not overhaul their business models in time.

In its most detailed analysis of the energy sector, the Transition Pathway Initiative (TPI) said 31 out of 109 energy firms were aligned with commitments governments have so far made under the 2015 Paris Agreement to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

However, of the 50 oil and gas companies assessed, just two – Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc – were aligned with existing national emissions targets. The remaining 29 companies on track to meet such commitments were all electric utilities.

“We, as a major institutional investor, are concerned that transition risk – the large and growing gap between government targets and company ambitions – is a major source of investment risk,” said Helena Viñes Fiestas, global head of stewardship and policy at BNP Paribas Asset Management.

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres wants governments to make more ambitious pledges to cut emissions at the U.N. summit on Monday, which he convened to boost the Paris Agreement ahead of a crucial implementation phase next year.

Current pledges by governments to cut emissions are nowhere near enough to meet the Paris target of keeping the rise in average global temperatures to well below two degrees Celsius, with a goal of limiting warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

That means that some companies’ targets can bring them in line with existing national plans under the Paris Agreement, but remain far from adequate to avert the worst of the natural disasters and economic damage forecast for a warming world.

TPI, which includes major pension funds and asset owners, said none of the oil and gas companies it assessed are doing enough to align their businesses with the changes needed to meet the Paris temperature targets.

The findings echoed a report published this month by financial think-tank Carbon Tracker, which found that big oil companies had approved $50 billion of projects since last year that will not be viable if governments implement the Paris deal.

By contrast, TPI found that nearly half of the utility companies are aligned with national commitments already made under the Paris Agreement, and more than 20% are on target to meet a temperature rise of below 2 degrees Celsius, the TPI said.

That is partly because some utilities have been quicker to pivot their business models toward renewable energy than oil and gas companies, reports Reuters.

“There is no doubt that oil and gas companies are in a difficult position in navigating the transition to a low carbon economy,” Euan Stirling, global head of stewardship and ESG investing at Aberdeen Standard Investments.

“That makes it all the more important that we have at least some sector constituents who are starting to respond to the climate crisis by repositioning their businesses from the top down in the same way that many power generators have.”

The TPI is one of several investor initiatives launched in recent years aimed at helping boost the quality and effectiveness of investor engagement with companies on climate. Among its other 45 signatories are firms including Legal & General Investment Management and U.S. pension scheme CaLPERs.

“We believe that investors should use their voice to hold top management of investee companies accountable for incorporating climate-related issues in their corporate strategy,” Carola van Lamoen, head of active ownership at Dutch asset manager Robeco.

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Energy

Investors turn heat on Big Oil ahead of UN climate summit

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Investors turn heat on Big Oil ahead of UN climate summit

Investors managing $15 trillion in assets turned up the heat on oil and gas sector on Wednesday ahead of a United Nations summit in New York aimed at accelerating efforts to fight climate change.

Energy companies are on the front line of the global transition to a low-carbon economy, with investors potentially on the hook for hefty losses if the companies do not overhaul their business models in time.

In its most detailed analysis of the energy sector, the Transition Pathway Initiative (TPI) said 31 out of 109 energy firms were aligned with commitments governments have so far made under the 2015 Paris Agreement to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

However, of the 50 oil and gas companies assessed, just two – Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc – were aligned with existing national emissions targets. The remaining 29 companies on track to meet such commitments were all electric utilities.

“We, as a major institutional investor, are concerned that transition risk – the large and growing gap between government targets and company ambitions – is a major source of investment risk,” said Helena Viñes Fiestas, global head of stewardship and policy at BNP Paribas Asset Management.

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres wants governments to make more ambitious pledges to cut emissions at the U.N. summit on Monday, which he convened to boost the Paris Agreement ahead of a crucial implementation phase next year.

Current pledges by governments to cut emissions are nowhere near enough to meet the Paris target of keeping the rise in average global temperatures to well below two degrees Celsius, with a goal of limiting warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

That means that some companies’ targets can bring them in line with existing national plans under the Paris Agreement, but remain far from adequate to avert the worst of the natural disasters and economic damage forecast for a warming world.

TPI, which includes major pension funds and asset owners, said none of the oil and gas companies it assessed are doing enough to align their businesses with the changes needed to meet the Paris temperature targets.

The findings echoed a report published this month by financial think-tank Carbon Tracker, which found that big oil companies had approved $50 billion of projects since last year that will not be viable if governments implement the Paris deal.

By contrast, TPI found that nearly half of the utility companies are aligned with national commitments already made under the Paris Agreement, and more than 20% are on target to meet a temperature rise of below 2 degrees Celsius, the TPI said.

That is partly because some utilities have been quicker to pivot their business models toward renewable energy than oil and gas companies, reports Reuters.

“There is no doubt that oil and gas companies are in a difficult position in navigating the transition to a low carbon economy,” Euan Stirling, global head of stewardship and ESG investing at Aberdeen Standard Investments.

“That makes it all the more important that we have at least some sector constituents who are starting to respond to the climate crisis by repositioning their businesses from the top down in the same way that many power generators have.”

The TPI is one of several investor initiatives launched in recent years aimed at helping boost the quality and effectiveness of investor engagement with companies on climate. Among its other 45 signatories are firms including Legal & General Investment Management and U.S. pension scheme CaLPERs.

“We believe that investors should use their voice to hold top management of investee companies accountable for incorporating climate-related issues in their corporate strategy,” Carola van Lamoen, head of active ownership at Dutch asset manager Robeco.

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BREAKING NEWS

Oil prices surge after attack on Saudi facilities

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Oil prices surge after attack on Saudi facilities

Oil prices surged on Monday after two attacks on Saudi Arabian facilities on Saturday knocked out more than 5% of global supply.

Brent crude jumped 10% to $66.28 a barrel, while West Texas Intermediate rose 8.9% to $59.75 in Asian trading.

Prices pulled back slightly after US President Donald Trump authorised the release of US reserves.

The strike, which the US blames on Iran, has sparked fears of increased risk to energy supplies in the region.

The drone attacks on plants in the heartland of Saudi Arabia’s oil industry included hitting the world’s biggest petroleum-processing facility.

It could take weeks before the facilities are fully back on line. State oil giant Saudi Aramco said the attacks cut output by 5.7 million barrels per day.

Jeffrey Halley, senior market analyst at Oanda said the price spike across oil markets was a reaction to the “political and geopolitical implications” of the attacks.

“The bigger issue is just how secure is Saudi’s infrastructure from attacks?,” Mr Halley said.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Tehran was behind the attacks. Iran accused the US of “deceit.”

Later Mr Trump said in a tweet the US knew who the culprit was and was “locked and loaded” but waiting to hear from the Saudis about how they wanted to proceed.

The Saudis have not gone into any detail about the attacks, barring saying there were no casualties, but have given a few more indications about oil production.

Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said some of the fall in production would be made up by tapping huge storage facilities, reports the BBC.

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BREAKING NEWS

Oil prices surge after attack on Saudi facilities

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Oil prices surge after attack on Saudi facilities

Oil prices surged on Monday after two attacks on Saudi Arabian facilities on Saturday knocked out more than 5% of global supply.

Brent crude jumped 10% to $66.28 a barrel, while West Texas Intermediate rose 8.9% to $59.75 in Asian trading.

Prices pulled back slightly after US President Donald Trump authorised the release of US reserves.

The strike, which the US blames on Iran, has sparked fears of increased risk to energy supplies in the region.

The drone attacks on plants in the heartland of Saudi Arabia’s oil industry included hitting the world’s biggest petroleum-processing facility.

It could take weeks before the facilities are fully back on line. State oil giant Saudi Aramco said the attacks cut output by 5.7 million barrels per day.

Jeffrey Halley, senior market analyst at Oanda said the price spike across oil markets was a reaction to the “political and geopolitical implications” of the attacks.

“The bigger issue is just how secure is Saudi’s infrastructure from attacks?,” Mr Halley said.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Tehran was behind the attacks. Iran accused the US of “deceit.”

Later Mr Trump said in a tweet the US knew who the culprit was and was “locked and loaded” but waiting to hear from the Saudis about how they wanted to proceed.

The Saudis have not gone into any detail about the attacks, barring saying there were no casualties, but have given a few more indications about oil production.

Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said some of the fall in production would be made up by tapping huge storage facilities, reports the BBC.

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Business

Petroleum Minister charges stakeholders of NLNG Train-7 to fast track project

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Petroleum Minister charges stakeholders of NLNG Train-7 to fast track project

The Minister of State for Petroleum Resources, Chief Timipre Sylva has charged stakeholders of the Nigeria Liquefied Natural Gas (NLNG) Train-7 project to fast track actions on the project.

The Executive Secretary of the Content Development and Monitoring Board (NCDMB), Engr. Simbi Wabote revealed this in Abuja at the signing of the Letter of Intent (LoI) for the NLNG Train-7 Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) Contract in Abuja.

In his goodwill message delivered at the ceremony, the Executive Secretary said: “The Honourable Minister of State for Petroleum Resources, Chief Timipre Sylva has this project as one of his focus areas to put an end to the drought of FID’s in the oil and gas industry in the last few years.

“Apart from the job opportunities and the accruable revenues from this multi-billion dollars Train-7 project, the Minister also sees the additional tonnage of LPG to be produced from Train-7 as a key benefit to reduce importation of LPG into the country.

“He is also excited that Train-7 project attracts other upstream gas supply projects required to keep the LNG train busy. The project opens up other development opportunities for some gas fields in the shallow and deep offshore acreages such as HI, HA, HK, and Opoukunou-Tuomo fields.”

Also speaking, the Executive Secretary of the NCDMB mentioned other economic advantages of the NLNG Train-7, just as said it would bring the fabrication yards of the NCDMB.

He said: “The NLNG Train-7 will deliver 100% engineering of all non-cryogenic areas in-country. The total in-country engineering man hours is set at 55% which exceeds the minimum level stipulated in the NOGICD Act in line with our resolve to push beyond the boundary of limitations.”

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Energy

Oil hits six-week high on hopes of extended OPEC cuts

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Oil hits six-week high on hopes of extended OPEC cuts

Oil futures hit a six-week high on Tuesday, rising for a fifth day on optimism that OPEC and other countries may agree to extend production cuts in a bid to support prices.

Brent LCOc1 was up 26 cents, or 0.4 per cent, at 62.85 dollars a barrel by 0349 GMT, while U.S. crude CLc1 was 27 cents, or 0.5 per cent, higher at 58.12 dollars a barrel.

Brent touched its highest since August 1, while U.S. crude rose to the highest since July 31.

U.S. oil gained more than 2 per cent on Monday, while Brent finished the day 1.7 per cent higher as the market reacted to the appointment by Saudi Arabia’s king of his son, Abdulaziz bin Salman, as energy minister on Sunday.

Abdulaziz, a long-time member of the Saudi delegation to the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said the pillars of Saudi Arabia’s policy would not change and a global deal to cut oil production by 1.2 million barrels per day would be maintained.

He added that the so-called OPEC+ alliance, made up of OPEC and non-OPEC countries including Russia, would be in place for the long term.

A meeting of OPEC and OPEC+ countries in Abu Dhabi this week “is stirring up hopes for additional supply cuts,” said Stephen Innes, Asia Pacific market strategist at AxiTrader.

Still, Russia’s oil output in August exceeded its quota under the OPEC+ agreements.

“Markets will need to see concrete progress on the production front, even as the world’s economy slows, to sustain gains,” said Jeffrey Halley, senior market analyst at OANDA.

Should oil end Tuesday higher it will be the longest run of gains since late July but headwinds remain as the U.S.-China trade war rumbles on.

Expectations

Executives at the annual Asia Pacific Petroleum Conference said on Monday they expect oil prices this year to be pressured by uncertainties surrounding the global economy, the U.S.-China trade war and increasing U.S. supplies.

In the United States, crude stockpiles are likely to have fallen for a fourth consecutive week last week, a preliminary Reuters’ poll showed on Monday.

Five analysts polled by Reuters estimated, on average, that crude inventories fell 2.6 million barrels in the week to September 6.

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Business

Oil falls as US-Iran optimism faces US-China trade deal hopes

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Oil falls as US-Iran optimism faces US-China trade deal hopes

Oil prices edged lower on Monday on the outlook for increased supply of Iranian crude after France’s president lifted hopes for a deal between Washington and Tehran, but losses were limited by growing hopes that the United States and China could make a deal to end their trade war.
Brent crude lost 33 cents to $59.01 a barrel by 1:07 p.m. EDT (1707 GMT), after hitting a session high of $60.17.
U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures fell 23 cents to $53.94 a barrel, after reaching $55.26 a barrel.
Prices fell after French President Emmanuel Macron said preparations were underway for a meeting between Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and U.S. President Donald Trump in the coming weeks to find a solution to a nuclear standoff.
Trump last year abandoned Iran’s 2015 nuclear deal with world powers, arguing that he wanted a bigger deal that not only limited Iran’s atomic work, but also reined in its support for proxies in Syria, Iraq, Yemen and Lebanon, and curbed its ballistic missile program.
Trump also tightened sanctions on Iran in May to try to choke off its oil exports.
“Now the market is pondering the possibility that we’ll see a flood or Iranian oil come onto the market if there’s progress made,” said Phil Flynn, an analyst at Price Futures Group in Chicago. “We have to be admittedly cautious because we’ve heard of deals one minute only to be tweeted down the next minute.”
Buoying prices, Trump said after a G7 summit of world leaders in Biarritz, France, that he believed China was sincere about wanting to reach a deal.
Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, who has been leading the talks with Washington, said China was willing to resolve the dispute through “calm” negotiations and opposed any increase in trade tensions.
Oil prices have fallen about 20% from a 2019 high reached in April in part because of worries that the U.S.-China trade conflict is hurting the global economy, which could dent demand for oil, reports Reuters.
China’s Commerce Ministry said last week it would impose additional tariffs of 5% or 10% on a total of 5,078 products originating from the United States, including crude oil, agricultural products and small aircraft.
In retaliation, Trump said he was ordering U.S. companies to look at ways to close operations in China and make products in the United States.
SEB analyst Bjarne Schieldrop said the oil market was worried about “the secondary global growth effects of an upwards spiraling trade war between China and the U.S..”
“The second concern for the oil market is that … China is now ready to wrestle with the U.S. in the global space of oil.

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Energy

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

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Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

Oil prices slipped on Tuesday, offsetting narrow gains in the previous session, as sluggish demand forecasts countered expectations that major producers would prop up oil prices by limiting crude oil output.

International benchmark Brent crude futures LCOc1 were down 18 cents or 0.3%, from the previous settlement, to $58.39 a barrel by 0310 GMT.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) CLc1 futures were at $54.81 per barrel, down by 12 cents, or 0.2%, from the last close.

“Although the outlook remains bleak, oil prices have remained anchored this week after a rapid response from Saudi Arabia, who is serious about stepping in to defend the oil price,” Stephen Innes, managing partner at VM Markets Pte Ltd said in a note.

Saudi Arabia, the de-facto leader of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said late last week it plans to keep its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to help drain global oil inventories.

Analysts expect the country to support prices ahead of its plans to float Saudi Aramco, in what could be the world’s largest initial public offering (IPO).

Saudi Aramco was ready for its IPO, but the timing for the deal will be decided by its sole shareholder, the Saudi government, a senior executive said on Monday.

Kuwait on Monday also reiterated its commitment to OPEC+ supply curbs after Oil Minister Khaled al-Fadhel said Kuwait had cut its own output by more than required by the accord.

OPEC and its allies, known as OPEC+, have agreed to cut 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) since Jan. 1.

But booming U.S. shale oil production continues to chip away at efforts to limit the global supply overhang, weighing on prices.

U.S. oil output from seven major shale formations is expected to rise by 85,000 barrels per day (bpd) in September, to a record 8.77 million bpd, the U.S. Energy Information Administration forecast in a report.

Gloomy forecasts for the global economy and oil demand growth have also dragged on oil prices as the trade dispute between the United States and China escalates.

“The swift reaction from Saudi Arabia will likely stabilize oil prices, but the oil price probably won’t move much above $60 per barrel until there is evidence of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations,” said Innes.

China’s central bank lowered its official yuan midpoint for the ninth straight day to a fresh 11-year low on Tuesday to reflect broad weakness in the local unit.

A lower yuan raises the cost of dollar-denominated oil imports in China, the world’s biggest crude oil importer, reports Reuters.

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Energy

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

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Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

Oil prices slipped on Tuesday, offsetting narrow gains in the previous session, as sluggish demand forecasts countered expectations that major producers would prop up oil prices by limiting crude oil output.

International benchmark Brent crude futures LCOc1 were down 18 cents or 0.3%, from the previous settlement, to $58.39 a barrel by 0310 GMT.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) CLc1 futures were at $54.81 per barrel, down by 12 cents, or 0.2%, from the last close.

“Although the outlook remains bleak, oil prices have remained anchored this week after a rapid response from Saudi Arabia, who is serious about stepping in to defend the oil price,” Stephen Innes, managing partner at VM Markets Pte Ltd said in a note.

Saudi Arabia, the de-facto leader of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said late last week it plans to keep its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to help drain global oil inventories.

Analysts expect the country to support prices ahead of its plans to float Saudi Aramco, in what could be the world’s largest initial public offering (IPO).

Saudi Aramco was ready for its IPO, but the timing for the deal will be decided by its sole shareholder, the Saudi government, a senior executive said on Monday.

Kuwait on Monday also reiterated its commitment to OPEC+ supply curbs after Oil Minister Khaled al-Fadhel said Kuwait had cut its own output by more than required by the accord.

OPEC and its allies, known as OPEC+, have agreed to cut 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) since Jan. 1.

But booming U.S. shale oil production continues to chip away at efforts to limit the global supply overhang, weighing on prices.

U.S. oil output from seven major shale formations is expected to rise by 85,000 barrels per day (bpd) in September, to a record 8.77 million bpd, the U.S. Energy Information Administration forecast in a report.

Gloomy forecasts for the global economy and oil demand growth have also dragged on oil prices as the trade dispute between the United States and China escalates.

“The swift reaction from Saudi Arabia will likely stabilize oil prices, but the oil price probably won’t move much above $60 per barrel until there is evidence of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations,” said Innes.

China’s central bank lowered its official yuan midpoint for the ninth straight day to a fresh 11-year low on Tuesday to reflect broad weakness in the local unit.

A lower yuan raises the cost of dollar-denominated oil imports in China, the world’s biggest crude oil importer, reports Reuters.

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Energy

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

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on

By

Oil prices slip as demand concerns outweigh efforts to curb supply

Oil prices slipped on Tuesday, offsetting narrow gains in the previous session, as sluggish demand forecasts countered expectations that major producers would prop up oil prices by limiting crude oil output.

International benchmark Brent crude futures LCOc1 were down 18 cents or 0.3%, from the previous settlement, to $58.39 a barrel by 0310 GMT.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) CLc1 futures were at $54.81 per barrel, down by 12 cents, or 0.2%, from the last close.

“Although the outlook remains bleak, oil prices have remained anchored this week after a rapid response from Saudi Arabia, who is serious about stepping in to defend the oil price,” Stephen Innes, managing partner at VM Markets Pte Ltd said in a note.

Saudi Arabia, the de-facto leader of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), said late last week it plans to keep its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to help drain global oil inventories.

Analysts expect the country to support prices ahead of its plans to float Saudi Aramco, in what could be the world’s largest initial public offering (IPO).

Saudi Aramco was ready for its IPO, but the timing for the deal will be decided by its sole shareholder, the Saudi government, a senior executive said on Monday.

Kuwait on Monday also reiterated its commitment to OPEC+ supply curbs after Oil Minister Khaled al-Fadhel said Kuwait had cut its own output by more than required by the accord.

OPEC and its allies, known as OPEC+, have agreed to cut 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) since Jan. 1.

But booming U.S. shale oil production continues to chip away at efforts to limit the global supply overhang, weighing on prices.

U.S. oil output from seven major shale formations is expected to rise by 85,000 barrels per day (bpd) in September, to a record 8.77 million bpd, the U.S. Energy Information Administration forecast in a report.

Gloomy forecasts for the global economy and oil demand growth have also dragged on oil prices as the trade dispute between the United States and China escalates.

“The swift reaction from Saudi Arabia will likely stabilize oil prices, but the oil price probably won’t move much above $60 per barrel until there is evidence of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations,” said Innes.

China’s central bank lowered its official yuan midpoint for the ninth straight day to a fresh 11-year low on Tuesday to reflect broad weakness in the local unit.

A lower yuan raises the cost of dollar-denominated oil imports in China, the world’s biggest crude oil importer, reports Reuters.

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