Coronavirus: What Nigeria can do post lockdown

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has warned that COVID-19 infection rates are likely to remain for a long time. There is therefore a need for countries to plan one step ahead of the epidemic curve. Nigeria is no exception. In Africa, it is among the countries with the highest number of cases. While the numbers remain low compared with many other countries in the world, it continues to rise gradually. Worryingly, the mortality rate stands at 3.1%. This is higher than some of its neighbours. For example, Ghana, which has…

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Hunger games: Socio-economic divide and response to disease outbreaks

The global count of confirmed cases of COVID-19 has since passed the six million mark, close to half a million families have lost at least one member to the virus and numbers are escalating even in Africa. However, across parts of developing world, despite national and state-wide lockdowns, calls to shelter in place and public awareness measures, many people have been afraid, but not of what one would suspect – they are not scared of death by the novel coronavirus. Rather, they are frightened by the prospect of death from…

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Undue politicization of judicial process by some judges

In what stands out as a most egregious departure from judicial ethics, certain judges in Nigeria insist on defendants before them bringing senators, senior civil servants, other specified high profile figures as sureties for bails granted by them. It doesn’t take hard reasoning to understand the exceptional abuse of power and corruption inherent in such practice. Why would a judge demand, as a bail condition, that the defendant bring a senator, a traditional ruler, a senior civil servant, a pastor, etc. as surety? What happens to the principle of separation…

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Kalu’s case: Commonsense and fidelity to the constitution (2)

It is trite a judge that proceeded on trial when he lacked requisite jurisdictional competence has not decided anything against the accused persons as he lacked power to so do and his actions or the proceedings no matter how well conduct amounted to nothing as it is a nullity ab initio. In the case of MPPP v. INEC & Ors (2015) Vol. 250 LRCN 1 at page 35UZ the Supreme Court held that “when a law provides a particular way/method of doing a thing, and unless such a law is…

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What glitters in Osun beyond the gold

With due diligence and rare candour, Osun State is carrying out a sentry go on its people and their treasures, both personal and collective. And suddenly, every citizen is getting conscious of the need to be proud of where they hail from. A typical citizen of America would tell the world, jauntily, that he comes from the “God’s owned country”. I don’t know about the past, but now, Osun indigenes can proudly tell whoever cares to listen that here is where God lives! Welcome to Osun, the land of the…

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Telecom gadgets and their in-built features

This piece is informed by the compelling need to ensure that the teeming users of the existing telecom gadgets are duly intimated on the in-built features of the devices and their impacts on humankind. Telecom is the short form of telecommunication. The term is often used in its plural form, telecommunications, because it involves many different technologies. Telecom is the transmission of signs, signals, messages, writings, sounds and/or images via wire, radio, or optical system, among other electromagnetic systems. It enables communication to take place between two parties that are…

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Nigeria, once an indisputable leader in Africa

T he traditional leadership and redeemer posture of Nigeria in Africa has, in recent years, been put into question.     Issues like corruption and infrastructural decay have held the country down from playing a leadership role in Africa. As have transitions from one poor leadership to another. A visionary leadership is lacking while public institutions are weak, inept and compromised. Decades of political patronage and nepotism have seen a corrosion of quality and performance in the public service.     In addition, the intractable problem of Boko Haram and…

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Information security and data control post-COVID-19

T he following are some of the means that businesses and organisations collect personal data from persons, which could be abused if not properly stored or protected:   Web-bugs: A web-bug is an invisible Hypertext Mark-up Language (HTML) object inserted in a webpage designed to track a visitor’s movement across the Internet.     Cookies: Cookies allow web servers to identify repeat visitors, preferences, and usage patterns.     JavaScript: JavaScript programmes can access information stored in the browser, including cached objects and the history of visited websites.    …

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Edo 2020: The hoopla around direct primaries

    T he June 22, 2020 primaries for the ticket of the Edo State chapter of the All Progressives Congress (APC) is emerging as a repeat of the 2016 contest between Governor Godwin Obaseki and Pastor Osagie Ize-Iyamu.       Both were major competitors at the off-season poll of that year, with Obaseki flying the flag of the APC and Ize-Iyamu running on the platform of the opposition Peoples Democratic Party (PDP).       Obaseki is gunning for a second term in office, while Ize-Iyamu, who recently…

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Information security and data control post COVID-19

A s the world moves to a new normal way of doing things, many businesses, religious and faith-based organisations are learning and needing to move their activities online. This comes with a headache as how to project, disseminate, protect, and safeguard your activities over the Internet.   Safeguarding your activities and important information from corruption, compromise, or loss is however dependent on your data protection mechanisms. The importance of data protection increases as the amount of data created and stored continues to grow at unprecedented rates. Protecting data from compromise…

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